Tag Archives: EVs

Ferrari 296 GTB
EVs ExplainedFeatures

Five myths about plug-in hybrids debunked (and four downsides to buying one)

When anything in life offers the best of both worlds and with little compromise, it’s almost always a solid choice. Diet Coke, the Long Beach Grand Prix, salty and sweet candy—life’s full of it. How does the LBGP come into play here, you may ask? Because it offers some of the best motorsports action, ever, and it’s not stuck out in the middle of nowhere. Another area where you’re having the best of both worlds is plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) ownership. That’s because these economical steeds offer all the convenience of being primarily powered by an internal combustion engine, yet also have an electric motor that tackles some propulsion and boosts overall fuel economy.

However, there are some common misconceptions about PHEVs out there that need to be addressed. By that same token, there are some actual downsides to discuss as well, as having all the information one needs before diving into owning one is just as important. Let’s plug in!

Image credit: Jeep

Myth: PHEVs are slow and not fun to drive

While a lot of folks who are well in tune with the automotive industry may say this isn’t actually a common misconception, it’s important to clear the air and ensure that even the most casual observers know what’s up.

PHEVs are actually quite the opposite: They’re quicker than their non-hybrid and full-hybrid counterparts. That’s because the electric motor is more integrated into acceleration, thus providing all that sweet instant torque to rip off the line. The latest 2023 Toyota Prius Prime, which I’ve had the opportunity to sample for myself, is the perfect example—the normal hybrid is no slouch for its class, but the Prime is shockingly fun to rip around in.

Additionally, the Jeep Wrangler Rubicon 4xe is quite possibly the neatest off-road experience, ever. Battery-sourced instant torque bodes so well for crawling, and the silent powertrain really helps out the senses with precision inputs. If you listen carefully with the doors removed, you can hear its all-terrain tires’ individual tread blocks grasp at the terra firma.

Don’t forget that the BMW XM is a PHEV as well. It may not be a looker, but it’s quite fast. So is the Ferrari 296 GTB, the McLaren Artura, and several other super and hypercars.

Image credit: McLaren

Myth: PHEVs’ EV-only range is too short

While PHEVs of yore only possessed a handful of miles when in EV-only service, this figure’s only gone up as battery technology has progressed.

For example, the aforementioned 296 GTB can go a whole 15 miles solely on battery power. OK, that’s actually a poor example, what I meant to justify my point with is the 2024 Volvo XC90 Recharge, which can go as far as 32 miles humming along. Er, that’s an improvement, but not the best example, either. The Prius Prime and its larger RAV4 Prime cousin both get over 40 miles of EV-only range, but weirdly, the latest Range Rover Sport has ‘em all beat: a reported EPA-rated 51 miles.

McLaren Artura Powetrain X-Ray
Image credit: McLaren

Myth: PHEVs have just as high maintenance and repair costs as ICE vehicles

This one’s coming from the EV, more specifically BEV (battery electric vehicle), owners who could be considered hardcore, true believers in an EV-only lifestyle. As reported by Consumer Reports a few years back (thanks to Torque News), PHEVs will have slightly lower costs of ownership over the lifetime of a BEV. BEVs have the lowest costs in the short term, but still, PHEVs’ are nowhere near an ICE car’s.

On the flip side, the convenience factor of PHEV ownership is quite appealing and is the best example of the best of both worlds: Excellent overall fuel economy, some battery-only range, lower running costs than an ICE vehicle, a smaller battery with a smaller replacement cost than an EV, no dependence on our nation’s current charging infrastructure, and more.

Image credit: Volvo

Myth: As PHEVs’ battery-only range increases, you might as well just buy a BEV

This one’s quite easy to extinguish, and again was reported on by Torque News: You might as well buy a BEV with all that electric-only range. This completely disregards many folks lacking local charging infrastructure, range needs, and more. Plus, what if you want to be unencumbered by charging infrastructure while on a lengthy road trip? It also means that some households may not need to park an additional car in their driveway to satisfy longer-range needs.

Again, this is best of both worlds content. Many folks can fulfill their daily range needs, potentially over the course of a day or two, and not have to worry about plugging in once they’re out of juice. Plus, PHEVs have regenerative braking that helps charge the battery, thus always having at least a little bit of zap in the metaphorical tank.

Myth: PHEVs don’t have the same tax benefits as BEVs

This one’s also easy to extinguish: Green Car Reports does a great job clarifying the IRS’ guidelines by sharing that there are still some excellent tax benefits to cash in on for 2023 and 2024. MSRP comes into play, and it must be a model that’s made in the USA, Mexico, or Canada, and has a battery that’s made in the USA. But there are still some solid options out there. In fact, that latter bit about made-in-USA applies to BEVs as well.

For example, any qualifying (because there are income restrictions—again, it’s complicated) Jeep 4xe buyer could receive up to $3,750 off their taxes, and Chrysler Pacifica PHEV buyers could count on as much as $7,500 off.

Image credit: Toyota

Downside: PHEVs are expensive

Still, even with some federal tax relief, PHEVs have a higher up-front cost compared to ICE vehicles. It’s amortized over time in fuel savings, but that doesn’t help out folks’ shorter-term budgeting that affects the household balance sheet month-to-month.

It doesn’t help that the average new vehicle costs around $48,000, either.

Downside: PHEVs are heavy

This is par for the course with anything sporting a lithium battery somewhere bolted up to its chassis. They’re not as portly as full-on BEVs, but weight is weight, which means increased tire, brake, and bushing costs. And, it’ll always have an adverse effect on handling, no matter how you slice it. Well, unless it’s a Ferrari 296 GTB, where the battery helps keep weight well-centered within its wheelbase. And even then, it still weighs less than 3,300 lbs, which most would say is plenty for its 654 horsepower to handle. Can you tell I really want to drive a Ferrari 296 GTB?

Downside: PHEVs are complex

This one’s pretty self-explanatory. You’ve got two separate powertrains at work, additional sensors, potential drivetrain additions to send their power to the wheels, a battery with its own electrical connection environment, and more. Plus, you can’t forget packaging, as the added battery presents a challenge to engineers and may result in either a larger vehicle than otherwise or a vehicle that’s more difficult to service. Or both.

Therefore, there’s more stuff to malfunction, fail, and extend/expand a factory-recommended maintenance schedule.

Image credit: Chevrolet

Downside: We need more series plug-in hybrids

Remember the Chevrolet Volt? That intuitive little fella was a series plug-in hybrid (SPHEV), more commonly known as an extended range electric vehicle (EREV). This means that only the electric motor handles propulsion while the internal combustion engine handles onboard charging duty, like a locomotive. This means you’ve got an onboard generator to cut down on visiting the charging station, or you can completely skip any combustion by plugging it in regularly like a BEV—it’s up to you.

Because of this, the Chevy Volt was truly something special, but sadly it went out of production in 2019. The upcoming 2025 Ram 1500 Ramcharger (kudos to Dodge for its name) will be an EREV, and the rotary-powered Mazda MX-30 R-EV could come to the US market someday, but otherwise, there’s nothing on sale as new at the moment. Which is a shame, as it’s a very appealing concept.

It’s important to address and analyze common misconceptions about PHEVs, especially considering the fact that they offer so much convenience over BEVs, yet burn far less fuel and have far fewer emissions than ICE vehicles. At the same time, it’s important to keep their downsides in mind, as it’s important to be well-educated on the matter before you make any major financial decisions.

2024 Alfa Romeo Tonale in the mountains
Image credit: Gabe Carey (Acceleramota)

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A motor court driveway full of vehicles overlayed with the text "Acceleramota presents: The best car deals of the day"
Deals

The 50 best lease deals and car sales of May 2024

Among our favorite pastimes at Acceleramota is mindlessly scrolling through car deals and sharing the best ones to help people like you (or myself) save money. Ask my wife. The only way I can muster the strength to get out of bed is to find the most cursed Facebook Marketplace listing that morning, and from the laughter-induced dopamine rush, I emerge. But, in genuine pursuit of the best lease deals and finance offers, nothing beats CarGurus. Our marketplace of choice for new and used cars, CarGurus, will connect you directly with a local dealer to redeem these sweet, sweet car lease deals and sales you’ll find on vehicles from all the top auto brands, including Kia, Mazda, Jeep, Chevrolet, Honda, and more!

Quick notes before I set you loose! As some dealers recently signed up with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to apply EV tax credits at the point of sale, keep an eye out for these models. Purchasing one from the right dealer could add even more savings – up to $7,500. That said, if you lease an electric car, any electric car, including plug-in hybrids like the Mazda CX-90, is eligible. In my experience leasing an Alfa Romeo Tonale, dealers are happy to pass on the savings. And when you’re in the market for a luxury vehicle, leasing can make more sense than buying anyway, especially when you can write it off on your taxes.

And don’t forget this. If you think you can score a better lease deal than what’s advertised here, you probably can. Dealer-specific lease offers can sometimes beat out what’s advertised by the manufacturer, depending on inventory and regional trends. So, if you suspect you can score an even hotter lease deal, then by all means, contact your local dealers, which you can do through consumer sites like CarGurus.

(Editor’s Note: Updated April 30, 2024. See updated pricing and new/refreshed offerings from Acura and Land Rover!)

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Acura deals and finance offers

2024 Acura MDX | $589 per month for 24 months ($5,999 due at signing)

Acura MDX
Image credit: Acura

Acura’s lovable, spacious, and dynamic crossover SUV has proven to be an endearing and honest-to-goodness luxury product despite lacking any ultra-advanced tech gimmicks or outlandish styling that rivals may have. Instead, the MDX, which we’ve sampled in its Type S performance trim, delivers luxury in the form of a plush ride, expansive glass with great outward visibility, and an ergonomic interior with a healthy dose of good ol’ reliable physical buttons for managing climate and stereo controls.

2024 Acura Integra | $349 per month for 24 Months ($4,999 due at signing)

2024 Acura Integra
Image credit: Acura

The Integra has a more defined and premium feel than other vehicles in its category, Civic-based or not. While it might not be as flashy as its rival companies, it certainly makes up for those shortcomings in how it handles the road smoothly and safely. It’s a decent value for its proportions and a worthwhile successor to the old Integra nameplate, complete with a decent and lengthy warranty compared to its rivals in this space.

Audi deals and finance offers

2024 Audi Q5 | $523 per month for 36 Months ($4,917 due at signing)

2024 Audi Q5
Image credit: Audi

Audio continues its history of comfort with the Q5. This luxury SUV is superbly quiet for its size, but they do say true luxury whispers. This model adds heated steering wheels as a standard. So if chilly morning commutes are a part of your week, this good be a lifesaver. Speaking of which, the Q5 faired well in crash tests. This paired with automated emergency braking, forward-collision warning, blind-spot monitoring, and rear cross-traffic alerts you’ll feel more than secure even with up to five passengers.

2024 Audi A3 | $440 per month for 36 Months ($3,834 due at signing)

2024 Audi A3
Image credit: Audi

For 20 years, the A3 has been an affordable small sudan and steady seller for Audi around the world. A more fuel-efficient entry makes this a great day-to-day sedan for the aspiring yuppie. The A3 is a bit more expensive than comparable vehicles but it is a smidge more performance-focused with a dose of added modernity and maturity. So what do you need for a few extra thousand? But all signs point to this being a dream to drive in all types of weather.

Buick deals and finance offers

2024 Buick Envista | $239 per month for 24 Months ($3,480 due at signing)

2024 Buick Envista
Image credit: Buick

The Envista is incredibly versatile, and it should cost an arm and a leg… But it doesn’t. Given the current market, this subcompact SUV is very affordable and well worth the investment. Buick designed this with a beautiful exterior, giving off the vibe that it’s a high-end luxury vehicle when it’s also a spunky, fuel-sipping crossover. It’s a good size for those who do not want to commit to a much larger SUV but still need the backseat space for pets, kids, and anything in between. A plus rating across the board for a Buick that’s under $25,000. Now, that’s crazy.

2023 Buick Envision | $309 per month for 24 Months ($3,929 due at signing)

Buick Envision
Image credit: Buick

Although the Buick Envision was discontinued in November last year, it is still an incredibly sleek compact SUV. Its sophisticated aerodynamic lines are in line with that of past Buicks. Exceptional fuel efficiency and smooth cruising have made this the 14th most reliable luxury and small compact SUV at iseecars.com. With heated seats and a heated steering wheel, this is a fan favorite for drivers in chillier climates. And the smart All-Wheel Drive means it tackles snow effortlessly.

2024 Buick Enclave | $479 per month for 24 Months ($4,977 due at signing)

Buick Enclave
Image credit: Buick

Buick is known for luxury, and they didn’t skimp on those details when designing the Enclave. A roomy interior means you can take up to seven passengers on your next trip, of which you’ll be riding in style. Every detail was well thought out with the lavishness you want from Buick. Plus, there is a moonroof for a panoramic view of the night sky. This is a dream for stargazers. The Enclave has a predicted reliability score of 85 out of 100, according to J.D. Power, which is great for an SUV of this stature.

BMW deals and finance offers

2024 BMW i4 | $499 per month for 36 Months ($4,599 due at signing)

2024 BMW i4
Image credit: BMW

BMW enters the all-electric chat. The i4 is a Gran Coupe that delivers a maximum range of up to 307 miles of smooth driving. With a driving performance that charts better than the gas-powered M cars that preceded it, this BMW is a fair entry into EVs. Now in it’s fifth-generation the eDrive technology is vastly improved. Even the position of the battery has changed the car’s center of gravity to ensure a smooth and secure ride every time. High-tensile steel and aluminum were used to mold this vehicle into a sleek beautiful car like only BMW could design.

2024 BMW X1 | $579 per month for 36 Months ($4,589 due at signing)

2024 BMW X1
Image credit: BMW

The BMW X1 is a classier station wagon. Just kidding, it’s BMW’s most affordable SUV, and there’s currently a lease deal on the all-wheel-drive, turbo four-banger xDrive28i. The X1 rates exceptionally on many lists in several categories and is probably one of the best SUVs available currently. Customers have noted its quick reflexes and roomy cabin, making it perfect no matter if it’s run to the grocery store or a jaunt out in the woods. A Benz for all seasons.

Jeep deals and finance offers

2023 Jeep Renegade | $339 per month for 42 Months ($4,599 due at signing)

Jeep Renegade
Image credit: Jeep

Outside of having a totally badass name, the Jeep Renegade is a solid and affordable SUV. This is Jeep’s smallest vehicle, and while this will be the year you’ll find it in America and Canada, there is still plenty of value in it. It’s dang roomy for its size, and the fuel efficiency is excellent, whether you’re running around town or heading into the wilderness for a camping trip. While it might not be as agile as its brother, the Wrangler, it handles bumps and humps better than many of its competitors.

2024 Jeep Wrangler | $349 per month for 36 Months ($4,899 due at signing)

Jeep Wrangler
Image credit: Jeep

Speak of the devil! The current-gen JL Wangler is the best version to ever exist. Packed with all the features, toughness, and reliability of previous generations, everything got upgraded. This off-road legend is timeless and always gets the job done. With a comfy interior and higher-end trims, you’d imagine this to be a much more costly vehicle than it is. There is a reason everyone knows the Wrangler. Trustworthiness and solid safety will earn you a legacy like that. 

Cadillac deals and finance offers

2024 Cadillac CT4 | $399 per month for 36 Months ($3,739 due at signing)

Cadillac CT4
Image credit: Cadillac

A solid entry in the luxury car space, the Cadillac CT4 is a compact premium sports sedan whose performance more than makes up for its size, thanks to the Camaro-based Alpha Platform chassis. This sporty and reasonably priced sedan allows those with a smaller budget to still enjoy the opulence of a Caddy. The Cadillac Smart System safety tech suite is really where the car shines and makes it worth every penny.

2024 Cadillac XT4 | $469 per month for 36 Months ($3,509 due at signing)

Cadillac XT4
Image credit: Cadillac

Cadillac’s smallest SUV is certainly big on details. A feature that truly makes this feel like a vehicle of the future is exterior LED lighting. Stay with me. Now, both the front and the rear have IntelliBeam auto high-beam. This is such a cool look on a very sleek SUV. With a nine-speed automatic transmission, front- or all-wheel drive, and a turbocharged engine, the XT4 certainly has speed on its side. If you think it’s time to own a Cadillac, you won’t regret this one. 

Chrysler deals and finance offers

2024 Chrysler Pacifica | $564 per month for 36 Months ($4,069 due at signing)

2024 Chrysler Pacifica
Image credit: Chrysler

My favorite thing about the Chrysler Pacifica is that it was so obviously used in product placement for a certain era of time, like in the Desperate Housewives PC game in 2012. A few Chryslers were but the Pacifica was prominent. But I digress, it has remained a best-seller for Chrysler and a fan favorite for soccer moms nationwide. It is, after all, America’s most-awarded all-wheel-drive minivan. This version is the only van that offers both gas and plug-in power.

Hyundai deals and finance offers

2024 Hyundai Elantra | $199 per month for 36 Months ($3,499 due at signing)

Image credit: Hyundai

One of the most affordable cars on the market, the Hyundai Elantra is in a class all its own. The 2024 version sees leaps in both tech and styling. The modern and streamlined shape makes it perfectly stylish for every day and long-haul journeys. This compact sedan also allows you to turn your phone into a key. Create a digital key to share with loved ones so they can unlock doors without your assistance. Integrating technology seamlessly into our vehicles and lives is all we’ve dreamed of.

2024 Hyundai Kona | $232 per month for 36 Months ($4,012 due at signing)

Image credit: Hyundai

The Kona is on the smaller side of SUVs, yet it manages all weather conditions with confidence and skill. Don’t let size be a deterrent; this is a safe and featureful vehicle. The Kona’s all-wheel drive maintains a firm grip on the slickest of streets, making it a great pick for locations with ever-changing forecasts.

Mazda deals and finance offers

2024 Mazda CX-30 | $244 per month for 36 Months ($2,999 due at signing)

Image credit: Mazda

Elegance was certainly in the minds of the designers for the Mazda CX-30. It quite literally is a work of art. Light and shadow are perfectly captured as this vehicle moves at all speeds; a constantly shifting S-curve dances along the doors. But it is also there as you admire the car from different angles, even at a standstill. It’s a beautiful illusion. The CX-30 is also one of the safest and most affordable vehicles on this list, with a 5-star rating from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Alfa Romeo deals and finance offers

2024 Alfa Romeo Giulia | $519 per month for 42 Months ($5,550 due at signing)

Image credit: Alfa Romeo

An Italian with luxury and performance, no, not that car maker. We stan the other famous brand, Alfa Romeo, ’round these parts. The Giulia is no exception; the quality and horsepower we’ve come to love from this renowned manufacturer are well on display. With its roots deep in motorsports, why wouldn’t it produce a car with the most powerful standard turbo engine in its class? The Quadrifoglio isn’t just a good luck charm. It’s a status symbol.

2024 Alfa Romeo Tonale | $379 per month for 24 Months ($5,210 due at signing)

Image credit: Alfa Romeo

Another beautiful Alfa Romeo makes the list. When I saw this at the 2023 New York International Auto Show, I gasped. It’s actually breathtaking. And as you would expect from Alfa Romeo, the Tonale handles like a dream. Our founder, Gabe Carey, also agrees with the sheer brilliance of the Tonale’s performance and appearance. We here at Acceleramota would rather be in an Alfa than a Ferarri. Sorry, not sorry.

Honda deals and finance offers

2024 Honda Accord | $279 per month for 36 Months ($3,669 due at signing)

2024 Honda Accord driving quickly around a corner on a public road
Image credit: Honda

Built for everyday driving, the Honda Accord is a popular midsize sedan for a good reason. Responsive steering, braking, and a comfortable ride are all reasons why you’ll find this model at the top of many lists. While this deal is only for the LX base trim, you’re getting the basics like Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, and a slew of driver-assistance features.

2024 Honda CR-V | $319 per month for 36 Months ($3,499 due at signing)

Image credit: Honda

The CR-V is a top-seller car for Honda. This sporty hybrid is rugged yet still sleek and efficient. It’s a distinctive style for sure, less angular and Gundam-esque than Toyota’s design language. You don’t need to be heading out for a weekend of camping to truly get the most out of this vehicle. So many of the features make everyday life easier, like the hands-free access power tailgate. Imagine loading in groceries and having the ease of the door just opening with a wave of the foot. What a time to be alive.

Nissan deals and finance offers

2024 Nissan Altima SV | $269 per month for 36 Months ($3,239 due at signing)

Image credit: Nissan

Manufacturers are getting better with safety and technology, and Nissan is at the forefront. The very reliable Altima is right there, ready to keep you safe should you dare exploit that BIG ALTIMA ENERGY. The intelligent all-wheel drive system remains vigilant on the state of the road and can react quickly. A feature like this is so important for driving in busy areas or long commutes. America loves this car for a very good reason.

2024 Nissan Sentra | $239 per month for 36 Months ($2,589 due at signing)

Image credit: Nissan

If you’re looking for efficiency, the Sentra is an excellent option. The 2024 version enhances every drive you take with cutting-edge technology, a dynamic style, agile performance, and a luxurious inside and out. Make your commute a little more comfortable with smooth handling and intelligent climate control.

Toyota deals and finance offers

2024 Toyota Highlander | $459 per month for 36 Months ($4,999 due at signing)

Toyota Highlander
Image credit: Toyota

A tried and true best-seller, the Toyota Highlander is definitely one of the best out there. Year after year, even little tweaks make this a highly desirable SUV. Everything about it was designed with the rugged outdoorsman (and woman) in mind. Its ability to handle all terrain with control and ease means there are very few places you wouldn’t be safe driving this. And that big ol’ turbo powertrain means plenty of torque to get up and over any obstacle. 

2024 Toyota RAV4 LE | $329 per month for 36 Months ($4,999 due at signing)

Image credit: Toyota

The RAV4 was made for the outdoors but handles just as beautifully in the ‘burbs or city. A darling vehicle for Toyota, the RAV4 is prepared to take you and your family anywhere. This compact crossover SUV is prepared to navigate trails with ease just as smoothly as it cruises the highway.

2024 Toyota Camry | $319 per month for 36 Months ($3,999 due at signing)

Image credit: Toyota

There is a very good reason the Toyota Camry is America’s best-selling midsize sedan. It’s everything you look for in a vehicle: style, performance, and safety. This sleek, smooth car has been a US fan favorite for 21 years, and the 2024 version keeps that tradition alive and well.

Kia deals and finance offers

2024 Kia Carnival | $399 per month for 36 Months ($3,499 due at signing)

Image credit: Kia

It’s like they always say: there ain’t no carnival like a Kia Carnival. This eight-passenger minivan features a spacious interior, cutting-edge safety tech, CarPlay, Android Auto, and, of course, it wouldn’t be a minivan without power sliding doors. Bear in mind that this deal only applies to the most basic LX trim.

2023 Kia EV6 | $299 per month for 36 Months ($4,499 due at signing)

Image credit: Kia

Heart set on an electric SUV? The Kia EV6 is a stylish midsize option with decent cargo along with sharp steering and handling. Its performance is impressive, too – you’re looking at Kia’s most powerful production model, complete with 576 horsepower. Go from 0-60 in only 3.4 seconds at a big discount. While this price is exclusive to the rear-wheel drive Wind model, check with your dealer because there may be incentives on other trims, including the all-wheel drive version.

2023 Kia Forte | $199 per month for 24 Months ($3,499 due at signing)

Image credit: Kia

The Kia Forte is a sophisticated little sedan with above-average utility and great value for the money. With a long list of available amenities, this comfy ride is an affordable dream for commutes and trips. The Forte offers excellent value when paired with good performance from the GT trim, high fuel efficiency, and a comprehensive warranty.

Subaru deals and finance offers

2024 Subaru Outback | $305 per month for 36 Months ($3,055 due at signing)

Image credit: Subaru

TikTok’s favorite manufacturer, Subaru, has rizz. The Outback is an excellent SUV and, for years, has outranked others in this category. Subaru boasts that 97% of Outbacks purchased in the last decade are still on the road today, so this is a very good investment to make. Those engineers are doing something very right; the Outback has become the definition of reliability and durability.

2024 Subaru Crosstrek | $299 per month for 36 Months ($2,549 due at signing)

Image credit: Subaru

A compact SUV paired with Subaru’s legendary Asymmetrical All-Wheel Drive traction makes this a killer pick for those on the go and off to the forest. The 2024 Crosstrek goes hard. This is the safest version of the vehicle that’s ever been on the market. Subaru upgraded their EyeSight Driver Assist Technology, as well as other detection sensors, to alert at a moment’s notice. Very smart to have in low visibility areas. They have also improved their Starlink connection for extra safety, which could be handy in dark, isolated woods.

2024 Subaru Impreza | $249 per month for 36 Months ($2,549 due at signing)

Image credit: Subaru

The 2024 Impreza is the ultimate all-weather vehicle, packed with cutting-edge technology, premium engineering, and a versatile, sleek hatchback style. For this reason, the Impreza was selected by experts at IntelliChoice as a SmartChoice winner for High Retained Value for two consecutive years.

Chevy finance deals and offers

2024 Chevy Malibu | $319 per month for 36 Months ($4,999 due at signing)

Chevrolet Malibu
Image credit: Chevrolet

Looking for an affordable midsize car for the whole family? We like the Chevy Malibu as an option. The Malibu is a reliable and competent sedan that’s kind of sexy and handles well. Honestly, if you need a car you wouldn’t mind letting your teen or young adult kid drive, at least you know it’s safe and sturdy. This almost decade vehicle has some staying power, it’s wallet-friendly, cushy, and spacious. 

2024 Chevy Blazer | $309 per month for 24 Months ($4,919 due at signing)

Chevrolet Blazer
Image credit: Chevrolet

My college truck was a 2001 Chevy Blazer. I drove it all over the mountains of Virginia and Pennsylvania. I loved this SUV, and so did my dog. I moved to NYC in this, so I can vouch for the roominess of it. There are tons of space for pets, friends, boxes, and even skiing equipment. I still think about how beautifully this handled in feet of snow and icy roads and had tons of torque to get up the entire side of a hill to a ski resort. The Blazer is definitely a vehicle I’d recommend for the sporty types. This 2024 version is one of the best yet. 

2023 Chevy Bolt EV | $309 per month for 36 Months (up to $4,919 due at signing)

2023 Chevy Bolt parked in front of attached garage
Image credit: Chevrolet

For the longest time, the Chevy Bolt EV compact hatchback was the EV price defender’s greatest weapon against their adversaries. Not only is it affordable, but it squeezes a lot of power into a compact package. Making considerably more horsepower and torque than the Chevy Sonic it supplanted, the standard Bolt EV can zip from 0-60 in just 6.5 seconds while carrying five passengers up to 259 miles at a time.

2024 Chevy Camaro LT1 | $279 per month for 24 Months (up to $6,689 due at signing)

2023 Camaro (silver) and 2023 Camaro (red) facing opposite directions
Image credit: Chevrolet

Few things scream American more than a V8, but alas, 2023 marked the beginning of the end for big block, high-displacement engines. So, why not make the most of it by leasing one of the last great muscle cars, the Chevy Camaro? Get ’em while they’re hot… and going out of production. The LT1 trim, as the name suggests, shares its 6.2-liter LT1 V8 small block engine with the Corvette C7, making 455 horses and 455 lb-ft of torque. Ain’t nothing wrong with that! Although current Chevy lessees can get away with putting $5,189 down, you will have to plunk down a sizable chunk of change if you’re new to the brand.

GMC deals and finance offers

2023 GMC Canyon | $369 per month for 36 Months ($7,999 due at signing)

2023 GMC Canyon
Image credit: GMC

This is GMC’s all-grown-up big-boy truck, and it is stellar. Although it is pricer than its counterpart (Chevy’s Colorado), this third-gen Canyon is turbo-charged and made very specifically for off-road. This is a workhorse of a pickup truck. With upgraded suspension, robust turbocharged torque, and supreme pulling power, the Canyon will quite literally get the jobs done on all terrain.

Dodge lease deals and finance offers

2023 Dodge Charger | $429 per month for 42 Months ($5,649 due at signing)

Image credit: Dodge

We are a bit biased here, but this is a good-looking car. This might also be sentimental, with the production of the Charger coming to an end, but it’s still a stunning piece of ingenuity. Dodge is releasing six packages inspired by some of the make’s most iconic looks. Whether on the racetrack or just cruising on the highway, the horsepower will have a special place in history and our hearts. Probably a good idea to grab one now, even if it’s just a cozy SXT cruiser.

2023 Dodge Challenger | $399 per month for 42 Months ($5,699 due at signing)

Image credit: Dodge

Past and present, the Dodge Challenger is a stunner. Even in its modern iteration, there is something beautifully timeless about it. Dodge knows how to make pretty perfect muscle cars. Another make getting sent to the junkyard in the sky, the 2023 Dodge Challenger is a glorious send-off version. The incredible horsepower and speed are something to behold for years to come. Instant cool points here, and right now, you can snag a plush SXT at a comparatively low cost.

Volkswagen lease deals and finance offers

2024 Volkswagen Tiguan | $289 per month for 36 Months ($2,999 due at signing)

Image credit: Volkswagen

Its spacious cabin comfortably holds up to seven people. It comes standard with heated front seats, and right now, lessees in select regions can take home the S model with 4Motion all-wheel drive for $299 per month – that’s like half the price of a monthly parking spot in NYC!

2024 Volkswagen Jetta | $279 per month for 36 Months ($2,999 due at signing)

Image credit: Volkswagen

An American fan-favorite, the VW Jetta is a modern sedan that is actually cool. Volkswagen doesn’t overlook any detail in this update. All materials were carefully selected to make the interior as cozy as possible, like a home away from home. This is especially true with a state-of-the-art digital cockpit for an intuitive user experience. Clear, concise driving information helps you get anywhere safely and efficiently. We get why this is a hit.

Ford lease deals and finance offers

2024 Ford Escape | $393 per month for 48 Months ($3,601 due at signing)

2023 Ford Escape side profile (red)
Image credit: Ford

While the Ford Escape might not be the most exciting car on the road, sometimes you just need an affordable, reliable daily to get you from point A to point B without spending half your salary on fuel. And that’s exactly what the Escape is: a practical, front-wheel drive family hauler with the option of all-wheel drive across trim levels. But even without any upgrades, the 2023 Escape includes all the bells and whistles we’ve come to expect from modern vehicles, including a touchscreen infotainment system, a backup camera, Bluetooth connectivity, and a six-speaker sound system.

2023 Ford Explorer | $496 per month for 36 Months ($4,855 due at signing)

Image credit: Ford

“Built Ford Tough” is a very true statement, and no vehicle exemplifies this better than the Explorer. This SUV was made to work, as it can tow up to 5,600 lbs. The Class IV Trailer Tow Package makes bringing your camper or boat along on your wilderness vacation quite simple. You don’t need to love the great outdoors to get the most out of the Explorer, but it doesn’t hurt. With Ford’s Co-Pilot360 Technology, stay completely in control no matter where you roam.

Volvo lease deals and finance offers

2024 Volvo V60 Cross Country | $609 per month for 36 months ($3,985 due at signing)

Image credit: Volvo

A roomy, hardy, and reliable wagon built for all adventures. The Volvo V60 Cross Country can literally weather all storms and road conditions. Regenerative braking with this mild hybrid means that energy gets stored in the  48V battery, and this helps cut fuel consumption and tailpipe emissions.  With all-wheel drive, an off-road mode, and high ground clearance, this is everything outdoorsy people search for in a car.

2024 Volvo S60 | $435 per month for 36 Months ($3,909 due at signing)

Image credit: Volvo

Volvo’s mild hybrids save fuel without sacrificing performance in the process, and their S60 is a beautiful example of this. The S60’s smooth takeoffs and gentle acceleration tackle the streets of cities and bumpy highways with ease. If you didn’t love driving before, you will after experiencing this car.

Mercedes lease deals and finance offers

2023 Mercedes S-Class | $1,349 per month for 36 Months ($10,763 due at signing)

Image credit: Mercedes-Benz

It’s okay to be posh; there is no judgment here. Every year, the S-Class evolves into a more intuitive and advanced vehicle, and that’s exactly what embodies the Mercedes-Benz User Experience. The sportiness of this sedan and its very recognizable grille not only help it stand out in the mix but also make it unmistakably an S-Class. This is kind of a beauty and brains situation, and it gets our thumbs up.

Porsche lease deals and finance offers

2024 Porsche Taycan | $949 per month for 39 Months ($9,829 due at signing)

Image credit: Porsche

Unlike VW, its more affordable sibling, it’s not cheap to own a Porsche, and the Taycan is no exception. Despite its $90,900 starting price, the base model Taycan might not keep up with the Tesla Model S in a straight line, but its two-speed transmission on the rear axle, superb handling and suspension system, and sportier interior make it a great family cruiser that’s still plenty capable on a track or a backroad. And now you can score one for under a grand a month for 39 months.

2024 Porsche Macan | $849 per month for 39 Months ($8,649 due at signing)

Image credit: Porsche

One might expect the 2024 Porsche Macan to cost an ungodly amount, but it’s quite reasonable. The Macan is Porsche’s other bread-and-butter sports ute behind the Cayenne and will soon be their second EV alongside the Taycan sedan. Porsche was able to create this Macan with a strong emphasis on the brand’s signature driving dynamics and steering feel. They ate with this model, and you’ll definitely turn heads cruising in it.

Land Rover deals and finance offers

2024 Land Rover Range Rover Velar | $849 per month for 36 months ($6,995 due at signing)

Land Rover Range Rover Velar
Image credit: Land Rover

Make a statement with the other lil’ Range Rover in Land Rover’s opulent arm. Arguably the sleekest and prettiest of the Rover SUVs, the Velar will be sure to turn heads with that deep front fascia and clean, mature rear fascia. Base Velars utilize a 2.0-liter turbo-four to output a respectable 247 horsepower and 269 pound-feet through an eight-speed auto, and Range Rover’s typical suite of drive modes and terrain settings are available for those who dare venture off the beaten Rodeo Drive valet driveway.

2024 Land Rover Defender | $829 per month for 36 Months ($7,495 due at signing)

2024 Land Rover Defender
Image credit: Land Rover

Every good list should include something a little high-end. Enter the Land Rover Defender. Is it silly expensive? Yes. Is it worth that price tag? Also, yes. When you look up the very definition of off-road there will be a picture of the Defender. Combine the sexy, flowing Land Rover box design with a beautiful, luxurious interior, and you get a winner. It could be more fuel-efficient, but when you look this good, that’s a small price to pay for everything else being excellent.

Best car subscription deals

Finn | $200 off first month

Promo code: FINN11XACCELERAMOTA200

Image credit: Finn

Finn is completely changing the process of what it’s like to shop for cars. In fact, we called it the best car subscription you’ll find in 2023. Browse its selection online of an ever-growing catalog of different makes and models, select your subscription term length, and then confirm your order. Your car will be delivered right to you if you live in the Northeast. And right now, we have an exclusive discount to save $200 on the first month of your subscription. Just use the code FINN11XACCELERAMOTA200.

Car accessories, merch, and collectibles

RevMatch | 15% off ANY coffee bag

Promo Code REDLINE15

Image credit: RevMatch

Don’t go falling asleep at the wheel. RevMatch has a wide selection of small-batch, craft-roasted coffee to help you start your engines (wake up in the morning). Right now, you can use the promo code REDLINE15 to receive 15% off everything on the site.

Acceleramota Merch | 20% off

Promo code: INSTANTTORQUE20

We’ve finally launched our merch store! And, starting off, we have a selection of T-shirts, crewneck sweatshirts, and hats to choose from. Be sure to use our promo code INSTANTTORQUE20 for 20% off your order for a limited time.

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Hyundai Ioniq 6 Limited AWD
New Car Reviews

Hyundai Ioniq 6 Limited AWD review: A masterful display of honesty and quality on wheels

Welcome to a society where seemingly the only way to encapsulate buyers is through toys, toys, toys! Flash, flash, flash! Gimmicks galore, and give us more! We love it when companies tout an upcoming product so heavily, placing it on a gilded pedestal for prospective buyers and investors to gawk. We also love it when said product becomes the center of ire and controversy in the public eye and when said products tend to fall apart, not do what they’re claimed to do, or backpedal on their original promises. But to cleanse our palettes and present to the world something refreshingly honest, we’ve been gifted the Hyundai Ioniq 6, South Korea’s entry into the affordable-ish electric sports sedan fray.

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Hyundai Ioniq 6 Limited AWD
Image credit: Jeric Jaleco

Price and specs

Key notes. The Ioniq 6 has few trims and a handful of powertrain configurations, including a base model with 240 miles of range, all-wheel drive, and rear-drive “Long Range” variants that achieve 316 and 361 miles, respectively, and less-frugal rear-drive models on 20-inch rollers that score 305 miles. This Limited Long Range tester on its 20-inch wheels has the big kid 77.4-kWh battery and dual-motor all-wheel drive, good for 320 horsepower, 446 pound-feet of torque, and 270 miles of range, plus all the goodies that come with being the top-rung Ioniq 6.

Base price:$50,150
As-tested price:$55,480
Motor/battery:Dual motor + 77.4 kWh lithium-ion battery pack
Transmission:single-speed
Drivetrain:all-wheel drive
Power:320 horsepower
Torque:446 pound-feet
Weight:4,578 pounds
0-60 mph:4.4 seconds
¼-mile:13.2 seconds @ 103 mph
Top speed:124 mph
MPGe:111 city, 94 highway, 103 combined
Range:270 miles

Ioniq 6 exterior design

The Ioniq 6 is unique, sleek, and sporty from some angles. It’s also weird, bulbous, and fugly from other angles. It’s tough to decipher what exactly Hyundai was going for, but I’ll give them props for delivering us a unique shape from the brick Polestar 2 and bubbly Tesla Model 3, and neither of them is that much of a looker anyway.

The side profile screams Mercedes CLA and CLS, which is likely a call to Hyundai’s European influence and their bid to out-German the Germans. The mid-level tailgate spoiler and rear lip spoiler give mild WRC vibes, like a Ford Sierra Cosworth or Escort Cosworth. Hell, add a support beam connecting the two and lift it on Fifteen52 wheels, and you have a Gen Z rally car.

In typical Ioniq fashion, squares and cubes define the little details of the Ioniq 6, and they can be found everywhere. And I mean everywhere. Check the seats, steering wheel, rearview camera, trunk release, exterior lighting, etc. It’s a CLA that’s been in Tron and back and has the pixels to prove it.

What’s hot?– Strong, sports car-like acceleration
– Well-tuned, easy to modulate brake and throttle pedals
– Far more premium driving experience than some key rivals
– Buttery smooth action of the many driver assists
– Abundant rear seat legroom
– Ergonomic interior with brainless controls

Ioniq 6 pricing breakdown

Hyundai makes speccing an Ioniq 6 really easy. Ready? Choose from the SE Standard Range, SE, SEL, and Limited trims. The latter three, with the bigger Long Range battery and more powerful motor, can be optioned with a rear-drive single motor or with dual-motor all-wheel drive. There are not really any major option packages on any trim aside from wheel locks, floor mats, road safety kits, etc.

A 2024 Ioniq 6 Limited starts at $50,150 and includes much of the same equipment as the lesser trims, from the digital displays to the safety aids and the 20-inch wheels. That fancy-schmancy Limited moniker does earn it a large power sunroof, power-folding side mirrors, a 12-volt outlet in the rear seats, and adjustable powertrain sounds for overgrown children who like it when their EVs make Star Wars speeder noises.

It’s me. I’m Overgrown Children.

Dual-motor all-wheel drive adds $3,500 to the price tag, while my tester’s pearly Serenity White paint tacks on another $470. Factor in carpeted floor mats for $210 and a $1,150 destination charge, and my tester rang the bell at $55,480, up there with the refreshed Polestar 2 and Tesla Model 3.

Ioniq 6 interior and tech

The digital gauge cluster and 12.3-inch infotainment screen are perfectly legible and have an adjustable blue light filter for nighttime driving. Bitching. Adaptive cruise with lane centering is standard. Yes, please. There are 360-degree parking cams that seem silly in operation but turn out to be real life savers when you realize you can angle them to peek just ahead of blind corners. Smart, indeed. There are not one, not two, but three methods of blind spot warning: A light in your mirrors, a visual indicator in one of the gauge cluster screens, and blind spot cameras on either side. Oh, yes! Uncrashable? No. But the Ioniq 6 will make you really hard to defend if you do crash one.

Built-in navigation with destination searching and EV charger locating is included. Hallelujah! But should you prefer to bring your own navigation from home, wired CarPlay is standard, and you can sit your phone nicely on the charging pad just beneath the dash controls, which feature a mix of haptic touch and hard buttons and knobs.

If you really want to get silly, the higher-trim Ioniqs come standard with a nearly infinitely adjustable ambient lighting setup and adjustable EV powertrain sounds, which can scale from “Off” to “Annoyingly Loud.” It’s a goofy and playful feature that emits fun sounds, like a sci-fi speeder or spaceship. It can just be set to irritating volumes, is all.

A brainless EV to commute in

Comfort done Korea’s way

I’ve only driven a Polestar 2 around a parking lot during the LA Auto Show, and I’ve only driven older, pre-facelift iterations of the Model 3, so I’ll hold back driving comparisons until I can get proper seat time in newer versions of both. But I can say this Ioniq 6 deserves a place among them, if not above them.

The cabin is wonderfully airy, and the contrasting accents and ambient lighting do a great job of breaking up the sea of black “bio-based” leatherette enough to ward off the feeling of bleakness German interiors are infamous for. The power sunroof amplifies the airiness, and the seats are perfect when running down every last mile of its 270-mile EPA range, although the roofline raises concerns in the rear seat for anyone over six feet. At least the legroom and trunk space are quite generous.

While initially drawing skepticism, the haptic touch climate controls work flawlessly, and every icon falls right into hand. The hard buttons for media controls are handy in a pinch, and Bluetooth and CarPlay are near-instantaneous to connect. Why no wireless CarPlay? Beats me. That’d be a knock against it in the eyes of younger buyers who love wireless everything nowadays, but at least what you’re given works exceptionally. Just give us a real frunk next time.

Perhaps the only real strike against the Ioniq 6 inside is the abundance of hard plastics reminding you of this car’s $37,500 base car roots and that Hyundai badge on its nose. But I can take the plastics knowing it’s screwed together far tighter than any Tesla I’ve ridden or driven in recent memory, completely devoid of squeaks or rattles, even over broken pavement and deep potholes.

Hyundai Ioniq 6 Limited AWD
Image credit: Jeric Jaleco

A driving experience worthy of luxury car branding

Around town, the Ioniq 6 feels authentic to itself rather than trying to be more of an appliance than it already is. It’s just a car, and it’s just a nice, well-insulated, compliant one with a little bit of spunk and classiness. The aforementioned driving aids work smoothly with inoffensive beeps and gentle operation of the adaptive cruise and lane-centering systems. There are four levels of brake regen, adjusted via repurposed paddle shifters, which change the in-town flavor of the Ioniq to whatever you’re craving, from full-regen with one-pedal driving to nearly off with normal car coasting.

Although this is the insultingly named “Long Range” Limited with a 270-mile rating, the second lowest in the lineup, my mixed driving returned a frugal 3.8 miles per kilowatt-hour. Times that by the 74 usable kilowatt-hours in the 77.4-kWh battery, and that’s a mixed driving range of 281 miles. Still not stellar, but better.

Hyundai Ioniq 6 Limited AWD
Image credit: Jeric Jaleco

The steering is sharp enough to make parking lots a cinch, further aided by the cameras, sensors, and short bumper overhangs. Again, shame on you if you so much as ding this thing. And while the ride is mostly comfortable, you can’t help but feel it’d ride leagues better with the lower trims’ smaller wheels and fatter tires, but such is the trend of “RIMS real big.” Still, the occasional firm impacts can’t shatter how well-engineered this car feels and how endearing it is. One can only imagine what it’d be like if it wore the Genesis badge.

Now, did I say spunk earlier?

The pleasantly sporty sports sedan

Ah, yes. How can I forget? The dual-motor EV with the sizable battery and oodles of torque just so happens to be capable of snapping your head back into the headrest like it’s attempting a G-force-actuated chiropractic service. The Ioniq 6 Limited AWD is no Ioniq 5 N or Model 3 Performance, and we’re yet to see if an N version will come to fruition. But 320 horsepower and 446 pound-feet from its dual motors and 77.4 kWh battery are plenty. That 270-mile range might not attract many buyers when Tesla exists, but it can surely make every mile a blast for those hopping out of their Elantra leases into one of these.

The comfortable suspension squats and exaggerates the feeling of acceleration, making the Ioniq 6 feel quicker than its reported 4.4-second 0-to-60-mph run, but it doesn’t flop on a twisting road or tight freeway on-ramp. The sharp steering, while devoid of feel, as is typical in this class, is well-weighted and less video-gamey than I remember in pre-facelift Model 3s and feels about on par with the Polestar 2. The firm, easy-to-modulate brakes can be adjusted in feel in the drive modes and in a Custom Mode individual setting. I felt little difference in either available mode, but either brake feel mode felt easy to get to grips with.

Just like how it’s easy for the Pirelli PZero all-seasons to get to grips with, well, the road and getting this roughly 4,600-pound brute to stick to the tarmac. I’d prefer a more eco-minded tire over what I’d call overkill, as I’m sure most normal buyers would, but this is dandy. The Pirellis, low center of gravity, clever suspension tuning, and 50/50 weight distribution result in an enjoyable driving experience, even when well out of the environment most Ioniq 6s will call home.

Want some extra spice with that spunk? Turn on the powertrain noises, and let them ramp up through the nonexistent rev band as they activate a Star Wars hyperdrive-like sound once you get up there in speed. For an added challenge, try braking using only the regen paddle shifters. Let the brain rot take hold, and you might actually think you’re engine braking. Man, the Koreans sure do know how to have fun with even their more sedate and mature cars.

Hyundai Ioniq 6 Limited AWD
Image credit: Jeric Jaleco
What’s not?– Polarizing styling
– Fastback roofline may impede rear-seat headroom for taller occupants
– Range is only okay in Limited AWD guise
– Plasticky interior
– Ride quality would be better with smaller wheels
– Laughable “frunk”

A masterful display of quality at an agreeable price

The Ioniq 6 exudes confidence without being egregious. Yes, there’s a sea of plastics, but they’re tightly bound and styled in an efficient yet attractive manner that appeals to both the tech-savvy and the traditionalists. It’s comfortable and can be more so if you step down in trim and wheel diameter. Its range isn’t anything to write home about, but it’s plenty for most metropolises and, as I’ve proven, has the potential to yield more than its EPA rating. The Ioniq 6 is surefooted and surprisingly fun when flogged just a wee bit, and everything blends together in a well-executed and cohesive manner that’s becoming less common in cars nowadays.

Hyundai Ioniq 6 Limited AWD
Image credit: Jeric Jaleco

The Ioniq 6 isn’t necessarily the definitive commuter car for me, but I can easily see it being the definitive commuter car for many. Rarely do I see present-day cars this likable right off the bat without pulling any sort of rabbit out of its hat to draw our attention away from any glaring deal-breakers. The Ioniq 6 doesn’t have to because it has no deal-breakers, except maybe having to rely on stupid Electrify America until Hyundai follows in Volkswagen’s steps and the revised Model 3 promising improved quality and performance at competitive pricing that’s tough to ignore.

However, in a refreshing turn of events, here’s an EV that’s not jingling keys for investors and hype beasts. Instead, here’s an EV that’s just an excellent car by an excellent company that’s still going through the glow-up of the century.

Hyundai Ioniq 6 Limited AWD
Image credit: Jeric Jaleco

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Genesis GV60 Magma concept front fascia closeup
Buying Guides

14 upcoming cars we’re itching to drive in 2024 and beyond

Auto shows are in full swing. Manufacturers drop press release after press release. Suddenly, it seems like the car industry has almost finished healing from its ransacking at the hands of COVID and supply chain shortages, and new cars are more abundant and more alluring than ever. Affordable cars, dream cars, daily drivers, and high-performance piss missiles, oh my! It’s a fun, if polarizing, time to be a car nerd or even just a new car buyer, so let’s take a peek at some of the hottest new cars worth looking out for in the foreseeable future.

Genesis Magma lineup

Car gods, be praised! We whined, and they listened. Genesis has finally unveiled concepts for the Magma family, its future high-performance lineup in the same vein as BMW M, Mercedes AMG, Lexus F, and Audi Sport GmbH. Details of the cars are unknown, but there will be a mixed crop of EV and gasser Magma cars. First to hit the scene will be a full-production GV60 Magma EV and the limited-run G80 Magma Special.

2025 Toyota 4Runner

After a quintillion years in car years, the current-gen Toyota 4Runner will soon be the outgoing one, as Toyota teased an all-new iteration on their social media. Details are scarce other than a close-up image of the tailgate badge and the knowledge that it’ll most likely be based on the same architecture underpinning the Tacoma and Land Cruiser. Expect a 2024 reveal and a 2025 product release, as well as carryover 2.4-liter turbocharged hybrid and non-hybrid powertrains from the Taco and Land Cruiser.

2025 Porsche 911 hybrid

Unlike most of the cars here, the 911 hybrid has not been officially revealed or teased in any capacity. But it’s coming. Test mules have been spotted meandering around Europe. Their appearances have only gotten more frequent with the turn of the new year, and some claim that we should expect an official debut come summer of 2024 when the 992.2 facelift arrives for the 2025 model year. We expect a 911 Hybrid to rock a turbocharged flat-six and a small lithium-ion battery driving all four wheels and enabling some trick torque vectoring.

Kia K5 hatchback (wagon)

Just look at it. Isn’t she a beauty? An affordable wagon. Leave it to the Koreans to at least style a car in a manner that at least exudes the vibe of upscale-ness, inside and out, even if we know it’ll be built to a low price point to sell at a low price point. Expect the standard K4 sedan’s naturally-aspirated 2.0-liter four pushing 147 horsepower and 132 pound-feet through a CVT and its 1.6-liter turbocharged powertrain pushing 190 horsepower and 195 pound-feet through an eight-speed auto.

2025 Ford Mustang GTD

I know it’s probably beating a dead ‘Stang by now, but the GTD isn’t out yet! And it’s no less cool moseying around from rotating auto show pedestal to rotating auto show pedestal. For the seventeenth time, bask in its GT3 race car-inspired, soon-to-be-Nürburgring-lapping glory as Ford’s new six-figure halo car for Mustang and motorsports fans alike. Ford aims for 800 ponies out of the GT500-derived 5.2-liter supercharged V8 and a sub-seven-minute ‘Ring time.

‘Electrified’ Honda Prelude

Like the 911 Hybrid, the Prelude’s specs are all up in the air. But we know it’s coming. It has to atone for the death of the Accord and Civic coupes and the rise of the GR86/BRZ and Nissan Z. The concept shows off Michelin tires surrounding some stout Brembos, and maybe there’s even a hybridized Civic Si or Civic Type R motor under that hood.

2024 Dodge Charger

Considering Dodge’s recent moves toward electrifying its lineup, starting with the Dodge Hornet R/T, it’s no surprise that the new Charger Daytona swaps its iconic Hemi V8 for a 400-volt EV powertrain. For car enthusiasts, though, nothing quite matches the resounding charisma of an internal combustion engine. And they can still get that with the Hurricane-equipped Six Pack variant.

2025 Hyundai Ioniq 5 N

In a piece for TechRadar, Leon Poultney called the Hyundai Ioniq 5 N “the first genuinely fun EV.” And he’s not alone. While I haven’t had the chance to drive one,  in my New York Auto Show demo ride, I was blown away by how well it simulated the experience of being in a gas car—minus the carbon emissions.

2025 Ram 1500 Ramcharger

I’m no truck guy, but the powertrain Ram conceptualized for the Ramcharger is like a Chevy Volt on steroids. Although it can plug into a DC fast charger for 145 miles of all-electric road time, this isn’t a full BEV. And despite the 3.6-liter V6 under its hood, the gas engine has no mechanical connection to the wheels. Instead, two electric motors—one in the front and one in the back—propel the Ramcharger, with the help of a 70.8-kWh battery not much smaller than that of a Tesla Model Y. Only when the battery dies does the engine go to work, burning fuel to recharge the battery if the battery runs out of juice and you can’t reach a charging station.

2025 Lucid Gravity

We’re all tired of third-row SUVs. Believe me, this Mazda CX-90 review sucked the soul out of me for like two months. Still, the Lucid Gravity appears to be one of the more polished examples in its class. Fans of the genre will appreciate its soft-touch premium interior, expansive infotainment displays, and for the Tesla-averse, physical inputs where they’re needed. Best of all, the front trunk doubles as a seat for reverse tailgate parties.

2027 Rivian R3

Remember the Lancia Delta? No? Well, then you probably live in America, where the five-door Italian hatchback was never released. Nonetheless, the Rivian R3 borrows from the Delta’s design language—or at least its wider-stance Integrale variant. The R3, however, is a cute little electric crossover built on Rivian’s new compact crossover platform—one I could very much see myself in when the Tonale lease is up in a few years. Oh yeah. I said a few years since Rivian was so kind, giving us from its 2024 unveil to its speculated 2027 release to drool over it.

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DealsNews

At $239/month, the Hyundai Ioniq 6 is an electric car bargain

Riiight. Let’s not beat around the bush. Cheap electric cars (plus infrastructure) are what we need for widespread adoption of the breed, but the market seems scarce on any super appealing options. Sure, the Tesla Model 3 Standard Range, Chevy Bolt family, and Nissan Leaf are effective and dandy vehicles, but they’re not really model citizens in style, quality, or character, and the Fiat 500e is still on its way. We need more, I say! Well, Hyundai seems like it’s here to help since you can now score their Ioniq 6 EV for as low as a $239-a-month lease. Two-three-nine. Sick.

Hyundai Ioniq 6
Image credit: Hyundai

For reference, a comparable Model 3 can be leased for as low as $329 nowadays. Late last year, Bolts were leased for $299. And Polestar is currently advertising Polestar 2 leases for as low as $379. At an econobox-rivaling $239, the swoopy-droopy-looking Ioniq 6 has been making headlines and fueling social media banter for being the cheapest EV lease on the market today, creating an alluring deal for urbanites searching for a solidly built, comfortable, and stylish electric car devoid of egg-inspired aesthetics or questionable leadership ethics.

The stipulations are just as intriguing as the payment itself, leading to some questioning its validity and whether it’s all some pending April Fool’s prank that we’re bracing for. $0 down. 24 months. Mileage not disclosed. Still, not bad for two years with one of the more well-received grocery getters currently on sale. Alternatively, SE AWDs will lease for $349 for $349 down, while SEL AWDs will go for $449 for $449; both deals run for 24 months, should you care. Perhaps the biggest catch is that prospective lessees must act fast, as the deal expires on April 1.

The Ioniq 6 isn’t a bad car, either. With an MSRP of $42,450 for the SE trim and $50,150 for the Limited trim before incentives or fees, it’s not the most expensive nor the cheapest EV to buy. Rear-drive Long Range variants output 225 horsepower and 258 pound-feet, which is good for 0-60 in roughly six seconds and a Hyundai-estimated range of 361 miles. Dual-motor all-wheel drive saps range down to 316 miles but boosts performance to 320 ponies and 446 pound-feet. Non-Long Range variants make do with 305 miles of range while driving only the rear wheels or 270 miles with all-wheel drive. Battery capacity is either 53 or 77.4 kWh, depending on the range variant. In the unavoidable looks department, its fastback silhouette is clearly inspired by the likes of the Mercedes CLA and CLS, and its compact footprint makes it a sweetheart in urban commuting. The “borderline luxurious” interior, as described by Motor Trend, is typical Hyundai, which is to say modern, ergonomic, and totally functional.

Hurry and cop one quick if you’re in the market! April Fool’s is just around the corner. A shame such a good thing can’t stick around forever, especially for something that’s a fresh break from the bottomless sea of Teslas and Priuses. But that’s life and the cruel, cruel world of the auto industry.

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Tesla Model 3 Highland
Car CultureHot Takes

Tesla’s borderline pointless Model 3 changes they claim are “updates”

There’s seemingly no shortage of Tesla slander on the internet. Some can be a little unfair, and others can be… well, Tesla sometimes seems like it’s asking for it, doesn’t it? After nearly seven years, Tesla released its revamp of the Model 3, with minimal updates that reflect the vehicle’s minimalistic styling. While few have hit the road, we look to popular YouTuber Doug Demuro for the inside scoop on what we can expect to see from the new Tesla Model 3.

Tesla Model 3
Image credit: Tesla

Quirks and features according to Doug Demuro

As we’ve already stated, and Doug agrees, the newly re-envisioned Tesla Model 3 doesn’t seem to have many new changes. Before watching the video, we were somewhat hopeful that he would enlighten us about some of his iconic “quirks and features” that would change our minds. At first glance, the most obvious cosmetic update to the EV is the front fascia, but Tesla is known more for user-focused updates, so we decided to hear Doug out.

Cosmetic updates for the Tesla Model 3

The front fascia of the car looks more like a mid-generation facelift than an actual update, and even at that, the changes are minor. The side body lines, door panels, and rear end of the car are noticeably unchanged, leaving us to believe this is hardly an update to the styling. If you are already underwhelmed by the appearance of Model 3, these “major revisions” aren’t going to spark your interest either. The good news is that Tesla continues to offer few features to allow buyers to customize their Tesla Model 3, with the exception being wheels and trim colors, so wrap shops and car customization businesses can rest assured that their place in the Tesla community will go on.

The rear end also has some subtle and barely notable changes to the rear end of the car, most noticeably in the taillight, which now forms more of the body of the vehicle than the outgoing model. Speaking of subtle changes, that is the best way Doug could politely describe the generally negligible updates to the interior.

Questionable interior changes for the Tesla Model 3

Sitting in the driver’s seat, Doug claims that although there aren’t many changes you can see, the overall quality of the textiles and surfaces has been updated. This is likely a direct result of owner complaints that the original Model 3 didn’t feel like a luxury car. New material choices on the dashboard and around the interior feel a bit like a page out of Lucid’s book, but we will give Tesla some credit for the effort.

The biggest change to the interior doesn’t even involve the driver but rather adding another iPad-like screen to the rear of the car for backseat occupants. To Tesla’s credit, the addition of entertainment features such as Netflix, Hulu, and the arcade mode is a big bonus for some buyers. Neat.

Don’t worry, though. There is one major change for the driver, and… We hate it.

If you’ve never driven a Tesla, you may feel slightly confused when getting into the driver’s seat of the original Model 3 because it doesn’t start or engage like your typical vehicle. With the outgoing generation, gear selection was available through a stalk that protruded from the steering wheel, alongside traditional turn signals and windshield wiper controls. In an attempt to make the car even simpler, Tesla has removed the shifter and turn signal stalks and made users completely dependent on the touchscreen or controls directly on the steering wheel, making us feel more like we’re driving a giant iPhone rather than an actual car.

Don’t trust it? Right. Neither do we. This is probably why Tesla added a failsafe in the form of ceiling-mounted gear selector buttons, kind of like the engine start button in a, er, McLaren Senna. Odd parallel, we know.

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A silver Rivian R3 crossover electric utility vehicle is seen with its headlights on.
Features

The rally-inspired Rivian R3 could turn the world of affordable EVs on its head

In the documentary Objectified by Gary Hustwit, there’s an extended sequence where industrial designers for automakers describe the joy of putting a “face” on the grille of a vehicle. I think about this bit every time I see a Rivian EV on the road, with its little cartoon frog-looking “eyes.” This proprietary headlight and grille array makes Rivian EVs immediately identifiable – an absolute plus for a brand still trying to find its footing in the increasingly crowded EV market. Rivian continued to turn heads last week when it announced not one but three upcoming mid-sized crossover electric SUVs: the affordable Rivian R3, the R2, and the R3X.

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Rivian lineup
Image credit: Rivian

Rivian R3 reveal highlights

In case your invite to the Fashion Week-inspired event got lost in the mail, Rivian put together this bafflingly edited hype video of some of the best moments from the launch.

Rivian R3 price and trim options

Details are still scarce for the Rivian R3, and production might not begin until 2026 at the earliest, but that can’t stop us from being excited about this affordable crossover EV. The hatchback-like R3 and its slightly bigger cousin the R2 are part of what Rivian is referring to as their new midsize platform:

This platform consolidates and eliminates parts thanks to intelligent design, including the use of high pressure die castings, a structural battery unit where the top of the pack also serves as the floor, and closure systems that dramatically reduce complexity.

Rivian Press Release
Rivian R3
Image credit: Rivian

Similar to other electric carmakers, Rivian plans to offer the R3 in three motor arrays: Single-Motor (RWD), Dual-Motor (AWD), and Tri-Motor (two in front, one in back.) The press release claims that the Tri-Motor model will have some real pep, with a projected 3-second 0-60 time.

While these numbers and engineering feats are impressive on paper, it’s best to stay cautious until we get closer to the production date. That said: you might audibly gasp (like the event attendees in the video above did) when you hear the projected MSRP. The base model Rivian R2 is expected to start at $45,000 and, given the flap Tesla absorbed over the Cybertruck’s ballooning ticket price, it’s safe to assume Rivian is over-estimating.

As for the Rivian R3? The company is hoping that the slightly smaller crossover vehicle will have an appropriately smaller price tag. We’ll update this post as we get more details, but a starting price in the $35,000 range would make the Rivian R3 a fierce competitor for the remarkably affordable Hyundai Ioniq and Kona models.

Rivian R3
Image credit: Rivian

2027 Rivian R3 Price and Trim Options

  • Electric Motor Options:
    • Single-Motor (RWD)
    • Dual-Motor (AWD)
    • and Tri-Motor (two in front, one in back)
  • Starting price: Under $45,000 (estimated)
  • Lithium-ion battery capacity: 1000V (estimated) via Rivian’s new 4695 battery cell
  • EPA-estimated range: 300 miles per charge (estimated)

Rivian R3 interior and tech

As with many newer EVs, the Rivian R3’s skateboard-style battery array allows the designers to pack an incredible amount of space into a standard crossover’s footprint. As such, the Rivian R3’s interior looks luxuriously roomy. I am 6’5″, and just looking at the pictures on Rivian’s site, I can hear my legs screaming, “Please! We need one!”

For what will be marketed as a budget crossover EV, it’s clear that no expense was spared when considering the interior. Sleek details and organic textures like cork hide the spirit of a high-end vehicle in the price tag of a starter EV. A massive center console display screen and a full LED dashboard display will surely offer entertainment, customization, and other important controls at the touch of a button.

Rivian is clearly aiming for the adventure-adjacent set with the Rivian R2 and R3. And the R3X promises to be both a high-performance speed machine and a more sturdy off-road model, offering an optional pop-up tent you can attach to the crossover’s roof. They’re calling the add-on the “Treehouse Tent” and it will initially be available for the R2, but Rivian plans to have it available for the R3 as well.

If you don’t feel comfortable climbing onto the roof of your car, that’s fine! With full fold-down seats, you could reasonably just set up an air mattress in the back of the Rivian R3 and save yourself the hassle altogether. Me, I’ll be at the hotel.

2024 Rivian R3 electric range and charging times

Rivian R3
Image credit: Rivian

As we alluded to above, Rivian’s midsided platform will utilize an all-new battery array that features 4695 lithium-ion cells, produced in South Korea by Samsung. These new cells will be 95mm long, as opposed to the 4680 cells that Tesla uses, which are 80mm. According to this exhaustingly detailed LinkedIn post, the 4695 cells will represent considerable improvements, including:

In terms of cycle life, the fast charge life of 4695 type cells is 1200cls, and the normal life is 2000cls, which is also greatly improved compared to the 4680cls of 1500.

Keven Chen

It’s worth reading the whole post if you’re interested in the lithium cell arms race, but the long and short of it is that the new batteries will be more efficient and last longer than 4680 cells. We’ll go into how this impacts the Rivian R3 electric crossover vehicle’s potential power in the next section. At the time of publication, Rivian is predicting around 300 miles of range on a full charge for the Rivian R3.

Rivian R3
Image credit: Rivian

2027 Rivian R3 engine and performance

Motor1 investigated Rivian’s new battery platform based on the info available and they estimate that despite the smaller wheelbase, the R3 (as well as the R2 and R3X) will be built with 1000V architecture. This could be a real boon for anyone hoping their midsized Rivian will pack a punch. To wit:

With three of these modules wired in parallel, the voltage will remain the same but the current available will go up considerably. We don’t know what the individual cell ratings are, but other 4695s are capable of pulse discharging at up to 10C, or ten times their rated capacity in amp-hours. This could mean available power as high as 900kW, or around 1,200 horsepower. 

Peter Holderith – Motor 1
Rivian R3
Image credit: Rivian

2027 Rivian R3 design highlights

We’ve glossed over it in this article because the news about the battery platform and price tag were so distracting but let’s be frank: The Rivian R3 crossover EV looks like it’s going to be as attractive as it is affordable. Taking design cues from classic rally vehicles like the Audi Quattro Coupe and Delta Integrale, the Rivian R3 is sure to turn heads once it hits the street.

In an interview with Road & Track, Rivian Chief Design Officer Jeff Hammoud said:

The brief I gave the design team was like, we need this to be our Solo Rally Car. So on our image boards, we had the Delta Integrale and the Audi Quattro coupe from that era… That nostalgic feeling where it looks modern, but where it looks like it’s from the future, and the past, at the same time.

Rivian CDO Jeff Hammoud in Road & Track

Clearly, a lot of love went into designing the Rivian R3, and the designers also spent a lot of time imagining what people might use the car for. An innovative “flipper glass” rear windshield flips up to allow for carrying long items like kayaks and surfboards. And to top off the back of this hatchback-esque EV, a cute little spoiler. Simply, chef’s kiss.

Rivian R3
Image credit: Rivian

We already covered the interior storage but a massive “frunk” is tucked away in this quasi-diminutive electric EV. Rivian owners are already delighted to see that the company has improved upon the R1 line’s hard-to-access front trunk.

Overall, if they pull it off, Rivian R3 could turn the world of electric vehicles on its head. No longer will EV consumers have to choose between form, function, and affordability. With its estimated sub $45k price tag and innovative battery array, we have high hopes for the Rivian R3.

Rivian R3
Image credit: Rivian

Rivian R3 review round-up

While the Rivian R3 electric crossover vehicle is still quite a ways off, some lucky reviewers did get a chance to see a prototype at last week’s launch event. So, while there are obviously no driving impressions and won’t be for some time, here’s a quick rundown of some of their thoughts:

One of the features highlighted by Scaringe during the event was a rear gate window that lifts up to allow for extra storage, especially of long items. (He called it “flipper glass,” but it was unclear if that was a nickname or something more official.) And like the R2, the rear seats fold flat for added cargo space — which he said “creates an opportunity for in-car camping.”

There’s still a lot that’s unknown about the R3, but if the R2 is meant to compete with the big boys like the Tesla Model Y and Ford Mustang Mach-E, then the R3 looks more like a rival to the Korean EVs, like the Hyundai Ioniq 5 and Kia EV6.

Andrew J. Hawkins – The Verge

And all of that isn’t even about the car I liked most from the showing. I’m a small-car guy (and you should be too), so the surprise small-SUV-crossover-rally-car-hatchback-or-whatever-you-wanna-call-it R3 was extremely exciting to me. I love the form factor, I love that they got their inspiration from ’80s Group B rally cars (complete with funky interior), and I can’t wait to see more details on this vehicle.

There were hints of a few neat hidden ideas on the R3, like a (removable?) storage compartment on the back of the driver’s seat on the R3X and some kind of cool strap-down blanket thingy on the passenger’s seat, but since the doors weren’t open and that car is quite far from production, those will have to wait for another day.

Jameson Dow – Electrek

The R3 looks more like a lifted hatchback than a proper SUV thanks to short overhangs and tighter packaging. We don’t have full dimensions just yet, but Rivian CEO RJ Scaringe said the R3 rides on a wheelbase that’s 5 inches shorter than the R2. It also looks to be shorter in overall length than the R2 (which itself is 15 inches shorter overall than the R1S). That hatchback look is emphasized by a large rear tailgate that integrates a flip-up piece of rear glass cutely named “flipper glass.”

The interior is made from sustainable materials including cork, and Rivian said it’s possible to fit a mattress in the rear hatch area (for camping trips or sleeping on a long roadie). You also get not one but two gloveboxes inside, and the interior design is classic Rivian, although it seems slightly more minimalist than we’ve seen in the R1 cars.

Nick Yekikian – Edmunds
Rivian R3
Image credit: Rivian

2027 Rivian R3 FAQs

When is the Rivian R3 crossover electric vehicle expected to go into production?

Rivian has announced that the R3 will begin production after the first production models of the slightly bigger Rivian R2 leave the factory. The company says this will allow smooth ramp-up and delivery of the initial R2 electric vehicles. By current estimations, that means the R3 will begin production in mid-to-late 2026. That means the first Rivian R3 crossover electric vehicle will likely be part of the 2027 model year.

How much will the Rivian R3 crossover EV cost?

At the time of publication, Rivian has not yet shared the targeted MSRP for the Rivian R3. The launch press release does mention that the base model of the larger Rivian R2 will be $45,000 and that the Rivian R3 will be priced below that. An MSRP below $45,000 would put the Rivian R3 in the same category as the Hyundai Kona or Ioniq 6.

What will the battery range and power of the Rivian R3 crossover EV be?

It is speculated that the Rivian R3 will be built on a 1000V platform featuring Rivian’s new, longer 4695 lithium-ion cells. In addition to allowing more design flexibility, this battery promises to have a longer life and more efficient charging time. In official press releases, Rivian says the Tri-Motor Rivian R3 will be able to go 0-60 in an impressive 3 seconds. This would put the Tri-Motor Rivian R3 on par with supercars like the Audi RS e-tron GT (3.0s) for (presumably) a much smaller price tag.

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The ultra rare hypercar, Aspark Owl, at Supercar Saturday Florida
Car CultureNews

All-electric Japanese hypercar steals the show at Supercar Saturday Florida

While most of the world is still thawing out from the tail end of winter, car show season is already hot and heavy in south Florida, and that means it’s time for Supercar Saturday, an all-inclusive and free car show hosted on the second Saturday of every month at the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino. Each month features an insane variety of supercars, trucks, modified whips, imports, motorcycles, and classic cars, but this show we saw something extra special: an Aspark Owl.

What is the Aspark Owl?

If you’ve never heard of the Aspark Owl, you certainly aren’t alone. In years of traveling and attending events, this rare hypercar is one of the only exotic vehicles I have yet to see in real life—and seeing it in person for the first time did not disappoint.

Aspark currently produces one of the world’s most expensive full EV hypercar, called the Owl. (Hint: It does kind of look like an owl). The Osaka-based company has only produced a limited number of this exotic vehicle, but with its distinct body lines and unusual appearance, you won’t have a problem spotting it in a crowd, even among the most extravagant sports cars in the world.

It’s no slouch in performance either, as the Aspark Owl is propelled by an insane 1,980 horsepower from an electric-only drivetrain with a reported top speed of 256mph and a nauseating 0-60 mph time of just 1.72 seconds which firmly cements its place as a legitimate hypercar.

Other epic supercars spotted

While the Aspark Owl sighting crossed off an item on my bucket list, we can’t forget about the other dozens of amazing supercars that took over the show. My personal favorites included the Lamborghini Huracan STO, which, in my opinion, is one of the best-looking modern Lamborghinis to date, super SUVs like the Lamborghini Urus and Aston Martin DBX, and both the first- and second-generation Ford GT.

Despite the intimidating name, Supercar Saturday has a bit of something for everyone. Classic Corvettes, modified sports cars, lifted and heavily customized trucks, and a handful of JDM imports filled up various sections of the parking lot, with over 100 cars to see and plenty of vendors to enjoy.

Follow Acceleramota on Instagram and sign up for our free newsletter to keep up with the latest car reviews, event coverage, meetups, and the occasional shitpost just for the hell of it!

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Ethernovia wallpaper
FeaturesNews

Meet Ethernovia, the tech company simplifying your car’s brain for the future of safer driving

Cars are hard. Computing can be harder. Yeah, I get it. And it doesn’t help when the central nervous system of your car, the brains and all its connected gizmos and wiring, are as complex as they’ve ever been. But easy, now. There exist tech companies out there that still do what a successful (and likable) company does: provide solutions and alternatives to problems. Actual problems. Ones they didn’t fabricate or exaggerate Twitter clout. I had a chance to chat with one particular company’s representatives at this year’s CES in Las Vegas, and now it’s time for you to get to know the company, too. Meet Ethernovia, the award-winning, San Jose-based tech company poising itself to tackle issues the car companies gave themselves.

Keep in mind that I am no super hardcore tech junkie by any means. Too much Super Street growing up rots the brain. But even so, I found myself so enamored by the efforts of this company, and I wish nothing more than to share my learnings and their mission statement with you.

Solving issues the automakers created

Ramin-Motortrend-Award Ethernovia
Image credit: Ethernovia

As I waited to meet with a rep outside some random booth on the CES floor, my face sweaty from meandering around all day and donning nothing but jeans and a loose t-shirt, I didn’t quite know what to expect. I never saw anyone’s faces prior to this, nor did I have a real clear understanding of what exactly this company is or what they do. A rep, who I later learned was an Acceleramota fan, simply liked our work and wanted to connect to help share their mission.

And what a mission, indeed. Well, if you’re the techy kind that enjoys problem-solving, and God knows the auto industry could use some extra wisdom. Thankfully, Ethernovia and other companies like it are here to impart that wisdom to the glacially evolving auto industry, with the goal of simplifying their electrical and processing systems while maximizing performance in the name of improved safety and lower production costs.

Think of Ethernovia as a sort of automotive neurologist.

As I’m sure you’ve seen, cars are complicated. Over the decades, with legislation after legislation putting greater pressure on automakers to implement more safety systems and customer after customer clamoring for the latest toys and niceties, cars have evolved from the mechanical relics of an all-analog past to the rolling supercomputers they are today. Even something as basic as a rental-grade Civic or a sparsely-equipped 86 is brimming with enough writing and sensors to throw aerospace engineers of old into a spiral. And as I’ve learned, automakers haven’t necessarily been the most efficient in developing and implementing such tech. That’s not to say the current ways of doing things don’t work, as they clearly do! But Ethernovia feels it could be better.

How Ethernovia does it

Miles of wiring and mini-ECU after mini-ECU occupy the innards of every car. Clearly, it must be a conspiracy to keep the rubber insulation and copper wire industries thriving! But such an abundance is what Ethernovia considers to be of great excess, and it’s what the company seeks to reduce. Not only would more minimalist systems maintain or improve the performance of the automakers’ designs, but it’d also reduce complexity and margin for system error. This equates to lowered production costs for the OEMs and safer vehicles for consumers, especially in a future heavily leaning into the safety assists and autonomous driving tech that relies so heavily on computers and sensors.

You’d think simplifying such systems would be a given for OEMs, but such an effort can often be overlooked when engineers get spread thin on a project or said manufacturers would rather just use and install electronics from existing legacy brands (Continental, Bosch, Denso, etc.)

Ethernovia stock car wiring diagram
Typical car wiring diagram, Image credit: Ethernovia

One way Ethernovia achieves its goals is through the consolidation of your car’s computers into fewer, dedicated ECUs. Fewer ECUs to communicate with also mean less wiring and chips, simplifying the production and assembly of the car’s electricals while still enabling all the luxury or safety toys the OEMs and consumers want. Another is through the production of more efficient, sharper responding “high-performance” ECUs, with lower power draws and less latency in its computing power, which is crucial when implemented in lane-centering, automatic braking, or adaptive cruise where every millisecond counts in emergencies. Data can be processed quickly, and the safety systems’ actuators can react sooner.

Speaking of which.

Ethernovia stock car wiring diagram
Diagram of Ethernovia’s consolidated ECUs, Image credit: Ethernovia

New gizmos for the era of “software-defined vehicles”

Right on time for this little tech talk/introduction of mine, Ethernovia dropped details on new chips they’ve been developing with efficiency in mind. The company announced the launch of two new 7nm PHYs (physical layers or basically the hardware in a circuit, such as chips, ports, and cabling), dubbed ENT11100 and ENT11025, respectively. Their claim to fame reportedly is that they have the industry’s lowest power draw while still having levels of processing power that meet Ethernovia’s standards for appeasing software-defined vehicles. For the die-hard techies who’ll understand it better than I do, know these new PHYs are the first and only products in their field to support 10 Gbps (Gigabits per second, a measure of bandwidth and data transmission), 5 Gbps, 2.5 Gbps, and 1Gbps.

At its fastest, Ethernovia’s PHYs are capable of transferring data at 4,500 Gigabytes per hour. At its slowest, it’s more like 450 Gigabytes per hour. Compare that to the estimated average of 25 per hour in today’s connected cars.

Ethernovia services
Image credit: Ethernovia

“Electrification, increasing connectivity demands, and the advancement of automated driving functions result in ever-increasing requirements on fast and secure data transmission in the vehicle and to the cloud,” stated semiconductor expert and systems architect for Volkswagen Group, Andreas Aal. “Ethernovia’s new PHY meets these demands by offering energy-efficient, high-bandwidth, low-latency data transmission paired with embedded co-optimized safety and security IP to enable a seamless and holistic architecture transition that paves the way up to future software-defined vehicles.”

Essentially, the ENT11100 and ENT11025 chips possess greater data transmission abilities for improving safety and functionality in today’s field of cars while being capable of saving energy. When implemented in mass within a car’s entire electrical system, the resulting energy savings could bode well for system reliability as well as possibly prolong the range of electric vehicles. Single-port variants are currently being sampled by prospective customers, with quad-port variants due to be available for sampling later this year.

Yes, very creative with the nomenclatures, I know. But at least all the creative juices flowed into making their crop of gizmos work as advertised to help automakers and consumers alike.

Ethernovia is up to some pretty rad stuff, and it’s companies like this seeking real solutions to real problems that we should be backing, not those who pride themselves on nothing but glitz, glam, and publicity through controversy. I wish Ethernovia and other companies like them the very best in their efforts, for if they succeed on an industry-wide scale, it will truly lead to the safer and more affordable cars we’ve been yearning for. And in my opinion, although it’s not the most star-studded headline, it’s certainly worth more curiosity than some 8-bit tinker toy of an EV rendered in 144p.

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Volvo S60 Recharge
Buying GuidesFeatures

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles with the longest all-electric range

As the world heads towards complete electrification by the end of the decade, many car manufacturers are looking for ways to go all-electric. While some automakers have eagerly jumped on the electrification bandwagon by rolling out all-electric models, others are taking a smoother route and introducing plug-in hybrid vehicles (PHEVs) in their current vehicle lineup. While adding a small battery and an electric motor might seem like a minor tweak, it can make a world of difference, especially when it comes to fuel economy. 

For folks who want to cut down on their fuel costs, a PHEV can be a very smart choice. These cars pretty much give you the best of both worlds: you can use electric power for short trips and switch to the gas engine for longer drives. But with so many options in the market, picking the longest-range plug-in hybrid can become a real head-scratcher. To find the perfect long-range plug-in hybrid electric vehicle, it’s important to understand what each option offers based on your specific requirements.

(link will open in same tab)

BMW 530e

What’s hot?

  • Comfortable passenger seating 
  • Tons of powertrain options

What’s not?

  • Rivals provide much more luxurious interiors
  • Optional packages (with desirable features) can burn a hole in your pocket

The BMW 5 series has always set benchmarks that people still use to compare with newer executive sports sedans. The 530e plug-in hybrid pairs the same exquisite powertrain offerings with an electric motor providing an all-electric range of 62 miles in WLTP tests or roughly 50 miles in EPA tests.

The recently unveiled 530e has a total power output of 299 horsepower, 11 more than the last-gen 530e, and an impressive 332 pound-feet of torque, up by 22. Knowing BMW’s strong performance, that should translate to more than adequate acceleration numbers. The 530e also benefits from the tons of upgrade packages offered by BMW and can be customized to make it your unique car.  

Ford Escape Plug-In Hybrid

What’s hot?

  • Comfortable seating
  • Plenty of cargo space

What’s not?

  • No all-wheel-drive option
  • Slower acceleration and handling could be better

The Ford Escape PHEV is the only front-wheel drive SUV from this list of the longest-range plug-in hybrid cars. This hampers performance in poor weather but improves fuel efficiency and all-electric driving range by quite a lot. So, if you don’t plan on taking this off the tarmac, you won’t miss the AWD.

The Ford Escape has an all-electric range of a respectable 37 miles on a single charge. The Escape has a 2.5L four-cylinder engine combined with a 14.4 kWh battery pack powering the electric motor to produce a total of 210 horsepower. 

Karma Revero

What’s hot?

  • Luxurious and exclusive design
  • Blisteringly fast acceleration

What’s not?

  • Tight cabin space and almost nil cargo space
  • Engine noise and vibration

The Karma Revero (formerly Karma GS-6 and Fisker Karma) is the fastest accelerating car from the current pool of long-range PHEVs. It is a sleek-looking sports sedan that’s essentially the PHEV version of its current full-size sedan and is quite exclusive in terms of price and availability. It gives aggressive styling along with a massive 536 horsepower and 550 pound-feet of torque from its BMW turbo three-banger powertrain (older versions had a GM EcoTec four-cylinder). To top it off, it offers a substantial 61-mile all-electric range.  

It is difficult to recommend this car to families, however, as the seating is quite cramped up at the back, and the ride quality could do with more comfort. Think of it as more of a sports sedan for that one eclectic buyer and maybe a couple of passengers every so often.

Land Rover Range Rover PHEV

What’s hot?

  • Practical and luxurious
  • Comfortable and refined

What’s not?

  • It’s a heavyweight
  • Mediocre cargo space

Big, bold, and now able to help the rich skirt past taxes when driving through the heart of London. The Range Rover PHEV is a complete package from the pool of long-range plug-in hybrids currently available. It is quite capable in off-road conditions and provides a great experience to the driver and the passengers. 

This posh and elegant utilitarian can travel up to 51 miles on a single charge in the all-electric mode, which is quite impressive for such a hulking thing. It also produces a combined power of an impressive 400 horsepower with a maximum torque of 472 pound-feet. 

Toyota RAV4 Prime

What’s hot?

  • Impressive fuel economy
  • Generous cargo and passenger space

What’s not?

  • Handling capability doesn’t match its speed
  • Longer than average braking distance

The Toyota RAV4 Prime unfortunately goes unnoticed due to its cousin, the Prius Prime, which is a shame given the RAV4’s practicality and impressive performance. The RAV4 prime is comparatively bigger and gives it a longer range of 42 miles. This car easily covers most daily commutes before actually engaging the internal combustion engine. 

The combined power the 2.5-liter four-banger engine produces, along with the electric motor, is a healthy 302 horsepower and a combined torque of 288 pound-feet, enabling hot hatch and entry-level sports car-rivaling performance numbers. Toyotas are generally known to be reliable machines, and the same goes for this PHEV setup. 

Lexus NX 450H+

What’s hot?

  • Best safety and reliability scores according to IIHS & JD Power ratings.
  • Impressive tech list for the standard model

What’s not?

  • Sub-par handling
  • Lesser back seat space

The Lexus NX 450H+ is another SUV in the list of long-range PHEV cars with an all-electric range of 37 miles. It has a motor on each of the axles, which enables the driver to have an all-wheel drive system. The NX 450H+ has a combined power of 304 horsepower and can do 0 to 60 mph in a quick 5.9 seconds – all this while also maintaining an efficiency of 36 mpg and a grand total range of 550 miles. Talk about a great pick for interstate cruising.

Toyota Prius Prime

What’s hot? 

  • Balanced ride and handling
  • Comfortable front seats

What’s not?

  • Slower acceleration
  • Limited rear headroom 

The latest iteration of the Toyota Prius is the perhaps best design of its lifecycle. This is not the only change, as the Prius now has a much more capable electric motor paired with an equally capable gasoline engine. It is quite impressive to see that the model that popularized PHEVs is still alive and well. 

The Toyota Prius Prime has an all-electric range of 46 miles. The Prius Prime has almost doubled its combined power output to 220 horsepower, whereas the electric motor can produce 161 horsepower on its own, which was more than the last Prius Prime did in total.

Volvo S60 Recharge

What’s hot?

  • Fresh, mature, and sporty design
  • Superb fit and finish of the interior

What’s not?

  • The design could be a hit-or-miss if you like ’em flashy
  • Kind of expensive

The Volvo S60 Recharge is the most efficient offering by Volvo. And we can’t not talk about safety when it comes to Volvos, so here’s a fun fact about the S60 Recharge – the 2022 model was IIHS’s top safety pick of the year in the mid-size luxury sedan category.  

It has an impressive all-electric range of 41 miles, considering the amount of power produced by this car. The S60 recharge produces 455 horsepower and 523 pound-feet of torque combined while retaining an impressive 69 MPGe rating. 

Hyundai Tucson Plug-In Hybrid

What’s hot?

  • Futuristic looks help redefine the Korean brand’s image
  • Spacious and practical interior

What’s not?

  • Dull base engine
  • Its handling leaves room for improvement

The Hyundai Tucson is one of the Korean manufacturer’s most unnoticed offerings, so to offer a PHEV version for it seems like a good decision. The Tucson PHEV knocks out most of its long-range PHEV competitors thanks to its peppier handling and commuter-friendly behavior.  

The Tucson has a 1.6-liter turbocharged four-banger bolstered by a 13.8 kWh battery, which produces a combined total of 261 horsepower and 257 pound-feet of torque. This is sent to all four wheels and is paired with a six-speed automatic transmission.

BMW X5 xDrive50e

What’s hot?

  • Comfortable ride
  • Well-balanced handling with plenty of grip

What’s not?

  • Not a connected drive like BMWs of old
  • Extra charges for driver assists is highly controversial

The BMW X5 xDrive50e has competitors from almost every brand in the market as it falls in the mid-size luxury SUV segment. The car, however, stands out in the segment thanks to its perfect mix of power, performance, and utility. It has loads of features and dozens of personalization options to make it your unique car. The X5 xDrive50e has an all-electric range of 40 miles.

The xDrive50e has a total power of 483 horsepower and has a torque of 516 pound-feet. The electric motors here are paired with a turbocharged straight-six engine. 

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