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Toyota GR86 and Toyota 86
Buying GuidesFeatures

Dealership and dash: Best new cars to take for a test drive

We hate going to the dealers. Don’t you? For many, going to the dealership is a stressful and unpleasant chore meant to be avoided unless absolutely necessary. However, it does open up the world of fun, drivable cars to the world of consumers, and there is nothing saying you can’t take some fun vehicles out for a test drive just for enjoyment. Just a wee taste. We’re not saying you gotta sign the papers on these things, but maybe, just maybe, a trip to your local dealer can be a fun way to kill an afternoon to sample some fresh metal you might actually want to buy. Or not.

Mazda MX-5 Miata – The impractical romance

For many drivers, the Mazda MX-5 Miata isn’t practical enough to own (though some of us don’t car), but they are absolutely worth a trip to the dealership to enjoy. Backed by decades of Miata reliability and presented with new styling and features, it’s obvious why this little two-door is a fan favorite. On paper, it may seem underpowered with an 181 horsepower engine, but the power-to-weight ratio of this minimalist car makes up for the difference. Don’t believe us? Drop by your local Mazda dealership and take one for a spin.

Acura Integra – Civic Deluxe

The Acura Integra was a fan favorite in the 1990s and early 2000s, and it made a strong comeback in 2024. With a buyer-friendly entry-level price of $31,800 for base models with a turbo 1.5-liter four-banger, this sporty sedan might trick you into turning your test drive into a spur-of-the-moment purchase. Bonus points: you can find A-Specs with six-speed manuals for that added enthusiast value. At 320 horsepower from the highest Type-S trim, it isn’t the most performance-oriented car, but it is practical and engaging — so we deem it well worth taking on a test drive, especially if you’re not willing to fork over the price premium over its Civic Type R sibling.

Toyota GR86 – Poor man’s Porsche

We’ve rambled a lot about the Toyobaru twins in past buyers’ guides, but the Toyota GR86 really should be on the “must test drive” list of every car enthusiast. It and its slightly tamer-tuned BRZ twin carry the torch of the affordable sports car deep into the 2020s. This sporty two-door has great looks and receives extra bonus points for the option of manual transmission and a nod to the Trueno for additional brand heritage. While muscle car enthusiasts and large-displacement engine purists would scoff at the 2.4-liter flat-four engine making “only” 228 horsepower, the peppy throttle response and tight handling make the Toyota GR86 one of the most acclaimed products in recent memory and one of the best new sports cars on the market

BMW i4 – Just a dandy EV

The BMW i4 has dominated reviews and “best of” lists this year, and if you’re wondering why, then it’s probably time to take one out for a spin. Buyers may be too timid to drop the $52,000 to $69,700 sticker prices you can expect to see on these electric vehicles. Still, from appearances to the driving experience, it is easy for EV-skeptics to forget that this isn’t a gasoline-powered performance sedan. What’s more impressive is how the i4 M50 is rated for performance that not only parallels a rear-drive M3 Competition but exceeds it, with a 0-60 mph time of 3.3 seconds. 

Alfa Romeo Giulia – Driver’s delight, mechanics nightmare

The Alfa Romeo Giulia may be a bit harder to find as Alfa Romeo dealerships aren’t as common as some more popular brands, but that’s what makes taking the Giulia for a spin a bit of extra fun. Most consumers haven’t experienced this brand, even if it is a well-equipped and reasonably priced entry-level luxury sedan. But, since we are looking for a great drive and ignoring the price — we aren’t here to buy, after all — go for the M3-fighting Quadrifoglio trim and enjoy the 505-horsepower provided by a peppy twin-turbo V6 engine. You can thank us later. Just make sure to opt for an extended warranty if you really decide to sign those papers on a Quadrifoglio at the end of the day.

Kia K5 – A cooler Camry

Over the past decade, we have seen Kia transform from a caterpillar into a market-competitive butterfly, and the Kia K5 more than proves that. In fact, the K5 breaks the mold for what people expect of an affordable, practical, entry-level luxury car at a starting price of $25,590 and a reliable amount of pep from a fuel-efficient engine. Oh, and by the way, the GT-Line rocks a 2.5-liter turbo four-cylinder that squeezes out 290 horsepower and 311 pound-feet while still scoring 32 mpg on the highway, wink-wink. Do with that information as you wish.

Test driving cars for fun is a great way to spend time behind the wheel of different vehicles, get a feel for what is available on the market, and, most importantly, enjoy some drive time for great cars like those in this list. And hey, even if it turns out that you hate the car you just drove, well, at least you got to try before you buy. Or, you fell in love at first wack of the throttle, then at least you got to take that car on a first date before making that commitment. That’s only fair as major stepping stones in life should always have a little trial run.

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Tifosi Sunglasses
Buying Guides

Tifosi sunglasses review: The best budget shades for driving?

I wasn’t sure what to expect when Gabe hit me up, saying some sunglasses company was interested in sending us stuff to sample. Us? Sunglasses? But then I thought about it. Most humans wear sunglasses every day on our silly little commutes to shield our feeble eyes from that dastardly ball of gas in the sky. Glare, whiteout reflecting off snow, clouds, and stupid Altimas, or direct sunshine funneled straight into your eyes all spell potential health hazards and an impending car accident. I’m no superhuman. I wear sunglasses on the road, too, and so do many of you, probably. So why not give these trinkets a shot? After all, sunglasses aren’t just for adding glitz to some snarky fashion freak’s aesthetic, right?

Tifosi Sunglasses
Image credit: Jeric Jaleco

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Price and specs

Thanks to Tifosi Optics, a fine producer of budget-friendly sports sunglasses, I had the opportunity to sample two styles of frames with two styles of lenses over the past couple of weeks during my normal-ass routine. Both had different feels and would certainly appeal to different tastes, but one thing they have in common is a stellar price point. When I titled them as “Budget Shades,” I meant it.

A quick bit of online window shopping showed me that their aviator-style glasses range from anywhere between $35 and $59, depending on the exact lens and frame. Their Rayban Wayfarer-esque shades bounce between $30 and $55. It’s not as cheap as something on a stand at the mall, but it vastly undercuts the likes of Oakley and Rayban. Expectedly, non-polarized lenses will save you tens of dollars, while polarized lenses, like my two testers, occupy the upper echelon of Tifosi’s price range. All sunglasses are sold with a lifetime warranty, and spare parts are available on select models, including the aviators. And should you need it, you can get Tifosi glasses with prescription lenses, as well.

As for typical Acceleramota specs, let’s see. 0-60 mph? Some day. Quarter-mile? I don’t know, however fast you can jog. Displacement? I’m guessing less than two liters. No turbos, superchargers, or hybrid batteries, obviously.

What’s hot?– Impressive glare protection comparable to more expensive brands
– Little-to-no slide or bounce
– Versatile lenses provide great vision, even in dimmer settings
– Lifetime warranty and replacement parts available
– Prescriptions available

Tifosi Shwae

Tifosi Sunglasses
Image credit: Jeric Jaleco

Tifosi Optic’s Shwae aviators are about what I expected for an affordable aviator. It rocked a far sturdier build and better lenses than your typical mall booth or airport convenience store sunglasses, albeit to say it had a sturdier build is to say it can still feel a little frail in your hands at times. Aviators are aviators, and you’re often left worrying about being a clutz and damaging the thin frame. Still, it sits great on your face and almost never slides off your nose, and the black polarized lens does a fantastic job of filtering our sun glare without inhibiting your vision much at all, even on overcast days and dim mornings or evenings. In fact, I’d go as far as to say it’s comparable to more expensive brands.

If I had one bone to pick, it’d be that the “scratch-resistant” polycarbonate lenses aren’t scratchproof. Interestingly, they went through less abuse than the other pair I was given, yet they seemed to scuff easier despite being made of the same lens material. Weird.

So far, it’s proven to be a solid pair of driving glasses that will be an invaluable aid once the brutal Nevadan summer rolls around to roast eyeballs left and right. And I mean, look at it. You’ll be safer on the roads and look fly at the same time—unless you don’t like aviators, in which case, I say stop being lame.

Tifosi Smirk

Tifosi Sunglasses
Image credit: Jeric Jaleco

Although I was more excited about receiving the Shwae aviators, it was these Smirk Wayfarer-ish glasses that actually left me the most smitten. The acrylic frame was tough enough to withstand my clumsy self dropping a few, okay, several times, yet flexible enough not to crack when finagled into my Subaru BRZ’s terrible strap-type sunglass holder. I received a brown “Honey” frame color, one of several available, that goes well with many outfits, and the brown polarized lens proved to be the most versatile, easily making short work of glare while still being bright enough to forget they’re even on your face, cloudy or sunny. There are also small rubber pads on the nose piece to keep it from sliding off your face, which is a thoughtful touch when other Wayfarer-style glasses are straight-up plastic.

For the price (a few dollars cheaper than the comparable Shwae, mind you), I’m impressed. I originally thought it wasn’t my style, but it easily became my new favorite pair.

What’s not?– “Scratch resistant” doesn’t mean scratch proof
– Aviator frame feels easier to bend or damage
– Polarized lenses (expectedly) cost more

Not bad. Not bad at all.

Sunglasses weren’t really something I put much thought into as a driver, despite how often I use them. If I receive a pair as a gift, that’s cool. Or if I forget to bring a pair on a press trip, well, that’s okay; the airport sells a bunch for ten bucks a pop. But genuinely well-made, high-quality sunglasses with quality lenses are not to be slept on, and I’ve learned companies like Tifosi exist to deliver them to the masses at agreeable prices. The Shwae and Smirk are such examples and have proven we don’t have to settle for less because better options are too expensive. Let’s not short ourselves because we’ll never know when glare will come to send us into the back of a semi-truck or sail us off the race track or into a crowd of pedestrians holding kittens and bunnies or whatever else we find valuable that we’d prefer not to hit.

Shoutout to Tifosi Optics for the opportunity, and good job on a pair of commendable products. Keep it up.

Tifosi Sunglasses
Image credit: Jeric Jaleco

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Buying Guides

Here are five great used SUVs for family hauling on a budget

New SUVs are expensive! You can thank dealer markups and cost of living expenses for that terrible news. However, not all is lost. If you want to get yourself or your family a nice SUV, you just need to look at a good used SUV that can do what you need without robbing you at the dealer. Now presenting our round-up of five great used SUVs that you can get in 2024 year that will help you find and choose the best soccer practice shuttle for yourself. 

Subaru Forester

Image credit: Carpixel.net

What’s hot?

  • Comes standard with all-wheel drive 
  • The Forester comes standard with many EyeSight driver assists 

What’s not?

  • Lackluster performance from the engine
  • “Meh” CVT

Subaru is often overlooked when it comes to buying cars, but that does mean the price of the Forester is often much lower, and you can get your money’s worth when buying one used. That does not mean the Forester is a bad SUV. In fact, it is beloved by people who like to overland and who love to explore the wilderness. 

The inviting size of the cabin and the features that come standard on the Forester make it an ideal family SUV. With Apple CarPlay and Android Auto being a feature since 2019, the infotainment functionality of the Forester is up with there with other premium cars, even if its appearance is a bit dated.  The engine and transmission of the Subura Forester is what many people complain about as the engine feels lackluster and the CVT introduced in 2014 is, well, a CVT. Even the best ones can make an engine drone and moan like a complaining brat. If you don’t mind the age, older variants with more conventional autos would do nicely, and you may even be able to find a turbocharged XT with a stick! However, the easygoing handling and impressive all-weather and all-terrain capabilities of the Forester make it an easy pick, nonetheless. 

Honda Pilot

Image credit: Carpixel.net

What’s hot?

  • Tons of cargo space and interior space.
  • The Pilot is reasonably fuel-efficient with its V6 engine. 

What’s not?

  • The third-row seats are not comfortable for long-distance
  • The infotainment system isn’t the most user-friendly in older generations

The Honda Pilot follows in the footsteps of Honda’s reputation of being practical and reliable but still has that premium feel. The Pilot shares the same platform as the Honda Odyssey but loses the interior space due to it being limited to becoming an SUV. This means that the Pilot does have a third row like the Odyssey, but the seats are not as comfortable for long distances. 

The exterior looks of the Honda Pilot are nothing special, and you can easily forget what the Pilot looks like when you compare it to rival cars. Even the driving experience is nothing special. This does not mean it is a bad thing, especially if you want an SUV that can easily tow between 3,500 to 5,000 pounds, is reliable and you do not want a flashy SUV.  The Pilot does come with many driver assists that come standard on all trim levels of the car, making it a very practical SUV to drive.

Ford Explorer

Image credit: Carpixel.net

What’s hot?

  • The rear-wheel drive improvements help with towing
  • Abundance of interior and cargo space 

What’s not?

  • Wind noise can be harsh at highway speeds
  • The interior material, build quality, and the seats weren’t that great

By owning a Ford Explorer, you can be seen as one of the most hated SUVs on the road, but you can have fun with it. I’m talking about how the Explorer is used by Police, and many people may mistake your SUV for a police Explorer (psst, get one in silver or dark blue for that near-universal Highway Patrol cosplay).

With the 2020 redesign of the Ford Explorer, you can get the SUV either in rear-wheel drive or all-wheel drive. This is an improvement over previous versions that offered the front-wheel drive version. The interior of the Ford Explorer wasn’t always up to par with rivals such as the Honda Pilot or Santa Fe. The infotainment systems and the safety technology inside the Explorer are very competitive when you compare them to rivals, especially in newer generations. It just the materials of the interior is that bring down this SUV, particularly in generations past. 

Hyundai Santa Fe

Image credit: Carpixel.net

What’s hot?

  • Some powertrain choices of later years are a hoot
  • The infotainment system is top-notch.  

What’s not?

  • There are a lot of hard plastic interior bits 
  • Some model years don’t have third-row seating

The 2.5-liter turbo inline-four in the Hyundai Santa Fe boasts impressive figures, making it a strong performer. Plus, the dual-clutch eight-speed transmission is just as willing to play along with you as it will happily downshift to get into the torque range of the engine. This means that you can surprise many unsuspecting cars at the stop light when you take off. 

While being a bit playful due to the power figures, you still get a great family SUV that is reliable and has infotainment systems that all modern SUVs and cars need to thrive in today’s modern world. One possible issue with the interior is the abundance of hard plastics that can make the interior feel cheap when you compare it to rival SUVs. Some used Santa Fe options may come with the upgraded premium quilted Nappa leather seats, but they are not as good as full luxury seats in more premium vehicles. 

Toyota RAV4

Image credit: Carpixel.net

What’s hot?

  • Easy to drive with excellent handling
  • Exciting powertrain in the RAV4 Prime plug-in hybrid

What’s not?

  • Interior can suffer from wind noise gruff engine noise
  • Ride quality can be harsh in more adventurous off-road variants

As the world’s first urban SUV (or so Toyota insists), the RAV4 has become a popular choice for people to buy. Due to it being parked in nearly everyone’s driveway for a very long time, it has become the standard on which many other SUVs are judged. And for good reason. RAV4s have always been reasonably efficient. Reasonably spacious. Easy to drive and easy to live with, all backed by that reputation of Toyota reliability.

The RAV4 has excellent features, as some of the later models come with wireless Android Auto and Apple Carplay. You also get great safety systems that include automatic braking and automatic high-beam headlights. Adventure and TRD Off-Road variants, if you can find them used, score standard torque-vectoring all-wheel drive, and hybrids offer an efficient yet lively driving experience, especially the Prime plug-in.

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Buying Guides

Here are five great used sports cars you need to welcome into your heart

Let’s be real: a soccer mom (or dad) SUV is no sports car, and a pickup truck may have the power, but it’s big, bulky, and cumbersome. A sports car needs to be lean, mean, and a genuine fighting machine. This is why these nimble and fast cars are the most fun on the road, but of course, none of us will dare to speed or break the law, right?  The only issue with getting a sports car is usually the price, especially the recent trend of dealers putting those ridiculous markup prices on our favorite new cars. So say, “screw the new car market,” and consider this crop I’ve compiled to be the best used sports cars you need to look at.

Mazda MX-5 Miata

Image credit: Carpixel.net

What’s hot?

  • With over 35 years of production, you are bound to find that perfect one
  • You can easily modify, fix, and race these cars as parts are readily available
  • The perfect “momentum car”

What’s not?

  • Piss poor boot space or interior luggage space versus rivals
  • May be underpowered to some, especially for the price of later-year cars

You do not need a tire-shredding behemoth of a sports car to have fun. Instead, a lightweight and (debatably) underpowered car can be even more fun. By getting an MX-5 Miata, you open yourself to 35 years of multiple generations offering different needs for different drivers. You can get the original NA model with pop-up headlights or the latest generation with all the fancy technology to help you drive faster. You can even get highly modified Miatas that can outperform anything on a track or for drifting. That is why a Miata is always the answer to any car question you need. 

What models to get:

I personally recommend the “NB2.5” Mazda Miata, which is the facelifted second-generation model of Miata. It comes in either a 1.6-liter engine or the 1.8-liter VVT engine. There is also the rarer Mazdaspeed spec of the car, which comes with a 1.8-liter  turbo engine, but these are quite pricey. Our editor insists on the high-revving, actually-kind-of-fast ND2 Miata, with it’s 182-horsepower screamer of an engine.

Ford Mustang

Image credit: Carpixel.net

What’s hot?

  • You get the iconic pony badge of the Mustang that comes with a lot of horsepower. 
  • It is an affordable option for a sports car. 

What’s not?

  • The automatic or dual shifting is somewhat lazy and slow compared to rivals. 
  • The Mustang is a heavy sports car and doesn’t handle hard corners like other sports cars. 

Often considered the first pony car, the Mustang is the face of American sports cars. Sorry, Corvette. The 5.0-liter or Coyote engine in most modern Mustangs offers that rich V8 sound no other engine configuration can beat, and later suspension advancements over the S197 and S550-generation cars lead to some seriously compelling track cars, i.e. Boss 302, GT350, Mach 1, etc. As Mustangs aren’t too expensive and are undoubtedly popular, it attracts a “special” crowd unfamiliar with coping with such performance. This leads to its infamous reputation, which is nothing the discerning Acceleramota reader should be concerned with… Uh, right?

What models to get:

2005 to 2014 “S197,” or the fifth generation of Mustang, is the most value-packed generation to get used to. It has a retro redesign that Ford brought out with the 5.0-liter Cotoye engine. It is also easy enough to get spares and modify to how you want the car to be, thanks to the near-infinite aftermarket support.

Toyota GR86, Toyota 86, Scion FR-S, Subaru BR-Z (they’re all the same, dang it)

Image credit: Carpixel.net

What’s hot?

  • Lightweight chassis helps with handling and keeps fuel consumption down (double win!)
  • The predictable, forgiving handling makes it a perfect beginner’s car to learn HPDE driving

What’s not?

  • May be underpowered to some, especially first-generation 2.0-liter cars
  • Interior has little storage space for your handheld items

Toyota and Subaru, from the start, wanted to make a lightweight, affordable sports car for people to enjoy, and boy, did they fulfill that goal to perfection. Well, almost perfection. The Toyota GR86, also known as the Subaru BRZ or Scion FR-S in older generations, has the perfect blend of chassis stiffness and compliant suspension to make it easy for people to drive these cars to their limit without hurting daily drivability. However, the flat-four engine is nothing too special, at least not without a bit of tinkering. With only 200 to 205 horsepower and that infamous torque dip that forced owners to somehow drive around it, the 86 sometimes feels like it’s missing something when you put your foot down. 

What models to get: 

The latest generation of 86 and BRZ that came out for 2022 is probably the best version to get, if not the cheapest. With a bump in engine displacement, you get 228 horsepower. Plus, you get the nicer interior and more aggressive styling. Just mind the oil starvation and RTV issues if you’re a track rat.

Porsche 911

Image credit: Carpixel.net

What’s hot?

  • Multiple flavors to choose from, with convertibles, full-on track cars, and cushy daily drivers
  • Flat-six engines that sound glorious 

What’s not?

  • Not cheap to maintain, meaning you will pay a lot for services and parts
  • They all look damn near the same, if that bothers you


Standing as one of the most recognized cars in the world, the Porsche 911 a real head-turner and a treat to any enthusiast. The unique flat-six howls will make anyone envious of your car, and the high performance bar is tough to unseat with any of its rivals. These German sports cars are almost too good to be true as the handling and power are perfect for the road. The competition of the 911 can not compare to them. The only major issue with the Porsche 911 range is that it can be too confusing sometimes, initimidating the unitiated with their littany of models and niches and with many generation models looking nearly identical. Plus, you also have to worry about the Porche purists who hate everything that is not factory spec. 

What models to get:

My opinion on which Porsche 911s to get is the 997 or the 996. These models are reliable enough, as the 996 was the first 911 to have a water-cooled engine, but it doesn’t look the greatest. That is why the 997 is the better option; you get a more traditional headlight arrangement with all the improvements, such as the 3.8-liter flat six producing 325 to 345 horsepower from just the base Carreras.

Dodge Challenger

Image credit: Carpixel.net

What’s hot?

  • More horsepower than you ever need to need in higher trims
  • Classic muscle car design with modern comfort

What’s not?

  • The stigma. Don’t look at me like that. You know.
  • Can be a handful for amateur (and overconfident) drivers 

This all-in-your-face American icon from Dodge is brute power, rude, and unapologetic. Why do you need to worry about fuel economy or your neighbors when you can blitz most traffic in a straight line? Pick your pison: You can fake it with the 3.6-liter V6 Pentastar Challenger or raise hell with a supercharged Hemi making 797 horsepower in the Hellcat Redeye model. Either way, this is one of America’s last hoorahs for producing pure, distilled hooliganism that its community wants instead of an electric muscle car with fake sounds, which is just cringe to think about. Fingers crossed the next one has can continue its lineage with spicy Hurricane-powered variants up its sleeve.

What models to get:

My personal pick is the 2015 Dodge Challenger R/T Scat Pack on the basis that they’re literally everywhere, and you snag a fairly nice configuration rocking 485 horsepower for relatively not that much dough.

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best foldable e-bike feature photo
Buying GuidesFeatures

What’s the best foldable e-bike for last-mile commuting?

That last-mile commute can be a pain for many, especially those who call the urban jungle home or those cursed to park in lots that’d shame a Mall of America. I know it. You know it. I’m sure millions more out there know it, too. Try having to park at a garage miles away from a store you want to visit or having to hike all the way across campus at the university just to make your dumb classes and not screw your attendance grade. Yeah. Well, thankfully, some smart minds graced us mildly lazy people with electric bicycles we can fold and stow in our cars! But with a market this saturated, it can be tough to pick the right one. So help us out and shoot us your picks for the best foldable e-bike on the market.

Once more, we want to give a shout-out to our friends, readers, and followers who helped us with our first community guide on racing sim wheels. Don’t forget to check that one out if you’re in need of one for your setup.

EVELO e bike
Image credit: EVELO

Think about it. You drive to where you need to go. Traverse all those freeway miles and whatnot. But your parking spot is far, or it’s July and a million freaking degrees outside. I’m all for fitness and getting your steps in, but sometimes, you just gotta say, “screw that.” Pop the trunk or hatchback, whip out your e-bike, and scoot along at a brisk pace that’d have paperboys of generations past envious. That’s the magic of an e-bike you can breakdown and simply toss in the back seat, little-to-no disassembly required and no shelling out extra dough for some trick bike rack.

If anyone reading has any bright ideas on their top pick or picks, drop us your suggestions in the comments section below! Just acknowledge the following requests:

  1. Give the full name of the product, including make and model, for easy search.
  2. Please list at least three pros for why you like it and two cons about your choice! Any pro or con is valid, from build quality to performance to pricing and value.
  3. Feel free to engage with fellow commenters on their choices, but be courteous and respectful! Constructive criticism or affirmations of the products can help with deciding buyers’ guide picks!

Sound good? Lovely. Have at it, and let us know what you got!

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Buying GuidesDealsFeatures

These are the best deals to grab from the F1 store in their huge winter sale

With pre-season testing still in Sakhir a month away, now is an excellent time to stock up on gear for the new year. The official F1 Store is having a massive winter sale to make room for new merch and styles. There are over 500 items to grab with discounts of as much as 70% off. We pulled a few of our faves that would make an excellent fit for your 2024 F1 Sunday outfit. And don’t worry. Yes, everything is officially licensed.

1) Scuderia Ferrari Race MT7 Track Jacket

Image credit: F1 Store

A few things Ferrari does well is make merch people want. This jacket is sleek and chic, you’re sure to stand out in the classic red hue. Save 48% on this, and cross your fingers for a Charles podium. Lord Perceval hasn’t had a win since the 2022 Austrian Grand Prix, but this jacket could be a good luck charm.

2) Mercedes AMG Petronas F1 2022 Team Baseball Cap

Image credit: F1 Store

A classic black baseball hat never goes out of style, and neither does Sir Lewis Hamilton. It’s just $17 and will see you through the 2024 season, and possibly podiums for both George and Lewis. This cap is easily adjustable and made from 100% recycled polyester, so it’s breathable even in the hottest of climates.

3) Oracle Red Bull Racing 2023 New Era Beanie

Image credit: F1 Store

Winter just decided to start with lots of snow in many parts of the world, so it’s a good idea to cover your noggin. Red Bull is a winner, and so is this adorable $21 beanie. It’s a polyblend (so easy to clean) and designed by New Era.

4) McLaren USA Crew Sweatshirt

Image credit: F1 Store

The papaya is strong with this sweatshirt. I like the vintage college vibe of this one, and I also like that this has crossover appeal. Wear it for F1, Formula E, and IndyCar races. It’s a cotton blend, versatile, and a steal at 57% off.

5) Scuderia AlphaTauri Team T-Shirt

Image credit: F1 Store

RIP Alpha Tauri. This shirt is now a collector’s item as the rise of Visa CashApp Racing Bulls takes its place on the grid. If you think that is an awful rebrand, don’t worry. We do, too. I heard a girl once call Alpha Tauri ‘Sugar-Free’ Red Bull, and honestly, why they didn’t go that way is beyond me. But grab this unisex cotton tee for just $27, and still show your love for Danny and Yuki.

6) Formula 1 True Classics Crew Sweatshirt

Image credit: F1 Store

There are a few basic F1 merch items available in the sale, and I love the ones that are so subtle. This classic crewneck sweatshirt is a nod to the start of the sport in 1950. With clever racing stripes down the sides, this is a mod way to show you’re a motorhead too. It’s just $33.

7) Mercedes 2022 W13 E Performance No.44 – Lewis Hamilton 1:43 Model

Image credit: F1 Store

A few of these models from the last two seasons are on sale for just $7. These make great gifts and decorations for offices, living rooms, and bookshelves. If you got a Merc fanatic in your life, this would be a nice little present to surprise them with. It’s die-cast metal and plastic and a stunning representation of the actual million-dollar monster.

8) Michael Schumacher Legacy Classic Edition Poster

Image credit: F1 Store

We recently celebrated the legendary driver’s 55th birthday. Schumacher has no doubt left a huge mark on F1 and motorsports as a whole. This poster honors him and his supreme legacy. Printed on high-quality paper it was designed by Automobilist as a collab piece with the Keep Fighting Foundation. This is a brilliant piece of art for only $20.

9) Aston Martin Aramco Cognizant F1 2023 Official Team Cap

Image credit: F1 Store

Save $30 on this 100% recycled polyester, totally adjustable official team hat. I love this green color and think it looks so stunning in a crowd. As a Fernando lover, I couldn’t make a list and not recommend something that represents him. There are a few items from Fernando’s Kimoa brand on sale as well.

10) Williams Racing Off Track Sweatshirt

Image credit: F1 Store

I think Williams knows how to lean into quiet luxury. Must be a British thing. This year especially they have designed a great line that isn’t flashy. This 100% knitted polyester sweatshirt has zipper pockets and is $39.

11) Alfa Romeo 2023 Valterri Bottas Driver Cap

Image credit: F1 Store

Of course, I’m including my favorite driver on this list. While Alfa Romeo was sunset for Sauber, the historic Italian brand will still live on. I have one of these and absolutely love the Milano cross and snake boldly standing out. I’m going to miss this team a lot, but I’m also preparing my soul for this to be Valterri’s last year as well. Nothing official, my gut just feels like this is it. Save 49% on this and add it to your collection.

12) Oracle Red Bull Max Verstappen Zandvoort Special Edition Tee

Image credit: F1 Store

Are you a member of the Orange Army? What better way to celebrate another outstanding year for Verstappen than with a tee celebrating the Dutch lion’s home race win? I love the Max design on this cotton unisex shirt in that fetching neon shade. Save it for the Dutch GP, or wear it every Sunday as they play the national anthem we’ve all come to know so well.

13) Haas F1 Team – Miami 2023 Limited Edition Poster

Image credit: F1 Store

Haas isn’t the best team, let’s be honest. But making dope posters is one of the good things they do. I love this one from the Miami GP, where, if you’ll remember, Magnussen actually got points. While their house may be a little on fire, so are these designs. This is not currently on sale, but if you sign up for the newsletter, you will get 10% off, and it ships directly from the printer.

14) Kimi Leave Me Alone Crew Socks

Image credit: F1 Store

There’s no way I could make this list and not include my other favorite Finn. These cotton blend socks designed by West Coast Choppers immortalize one of Kimi’s best F1 moments. These are also a great way to communicate with loved ones when the race is on.

15) Pirelli Podium Cap

#image_title

This is not on sale either, but I highly recommend buying this on the site and not at the track, where it is double the price. This is an item I want to add to my hat arsenal, and I just love the way it looks. It’s one of those “if you know, you know” when you see one in the wild. It’s retro, which adds a little something. You don’t need to be a fan to rock this, but it doesn’t hurt

If you are interested in catching the Bahrain GP, it will be on Sunday, March 2 at 10 a.m. (EST) on ESPN in North America and, as always, on F1TV.

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Gaming Sim Wheel Round-Up Question
Buying GuidesFeatures

What’s the best racing sim wheel for your gaming setup?

Hey! Calling all techies, gamers, and gearheads. Come hither and help us answer an increasingly popular question in this day and age: What’s the best racing sim wheel for your gaming setup? Because the best racing games shouldn’t be held back by mere buttons and joysticks.

As someone who’s not the most serious gamer, I am not one to answer this question for you. But what better source of information than you, the community who partakes in the heat of motorsports without ever seeing a ray of sunshine or smelling a whiff of race gas? I’ve witnessed my far more dedicated gaming friends adopt racing sim wheels for everything from Gran Turismo and Assetto Corsa to Burnout (remember those games?) and Forza Horizon. And of course they would. It’s that added immersion from a proper racing sim setup that makes those titles worthwhile, that tactile sensation through your palms and fingertips that no DualShock can match. Sorry, Sony.

Racing sim stock photo
Image credit: iStock

Sadly, I’m a cheap, lazy bastard who can’t be bothered to upgrade their phone, let alone snag a sim wheel for the hour of Forza I play every now and then. I won’t pretend I know what’s best for you. But you know what’s best for you. Oh yeah, you do. And maybe someone else out there could use your advice and would love to know what you have to say. So, please join us in the comments below, and voice your thoughts on what you think are the best racing sim wheels and why!

While you’re in there, please take note to:

  1. Give the full name of the product, including make and model, for easy search.
  2. Please list at least three pros for why you like it and two cons about your choice! Any pro or con is valid, from build quality to steering feel to pricing and value.
  3. Feel free to engage with fellow commenters on their choices, but be courteous and respectful! Constructive criticism or affirmations of the products can help with deciding buyers’ guide picks!

Got that? Good. Ready, set, discuss!

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Best Formula 1 Books feature photo
Features

The best racing books for Formula 1 nerds

As the Formula 1 summer break draws to an end, there is still plenty of time to get another beach read in or tackle another book on your Goodreads challenge. If this is your first F1 break and you’re a newer fan, this is a great time to dive in with some of my favorite racing books.

Something you will realize quite quickly is how intertwined all these stories are within this industry and how everyone plays a part in the others’ stories, so to speak. 

1) Surviving to Drive – Guenther Steiner

Why not start with the most recent entry? Guenther Steiner, the lovable foul-mouthed team principal of Haas, gives you a play-by-play of a full F1 season in this book. What’s especially interesting about Guenther’s encounters are all he had to deal with in the timeframe he’s writing about: managing a smaller team, guiding a rookie with a very famous last name, navigating the politics of having a Russian driver, maintaining momentum during a pandemic, and keeping your sanity at 140MPH. This book is very much laid out like diary entries if the diary is that of a surly 58-year-old Italian running a $710 million motorsports team. 

As you would expect, if you’ve seen a presser with Guenther, he’s blunt, funny, and always real, which you have to appreciate running the smallest teams on the grid. He references several big moments from his perspective in this book. Rewatch the last Driver to Survive in tandem with this. It’s quite a tall tale.  

2) How To Be An F1 Driver – Jenson Button

This is hands down my favorite of all of the books. Yes, I have mentioned Jenson Button many times, but I truly believe his How to Be an F1 Driver is an amazing primer for even the most casual of fans. Jenson is so unbelievably cheeky and charming, which comes through in every chapter. Dare I say this book made me love him even more? 

He gives a lot of admirable life advice anyone could benefit from, not just the best drivers in the world. And again, their stories are all intertwined. His old karting partner was Sophie Kumpen… Max Verstappen’s mom. He talks about being dragged into covering for Fernando Alonso in 2017 at the Monaco GP, where the famous “Yenson, my friend!” quote comes from.

In a playful way, Jenson gives you an especially real look inside what it’s like to be a Championship driver in an ever-changing landscape of technology, rules, and relationships.

If you follow Jenson online, you can tell something is brewing. This man is poised for a comeback on some circuit beyond the occasional NASCAR spin and driving the Garage 56 car around the world. I, for one, would love to see more of Jenson behind the wheel. Overall, it’s a funny, quick, and insightful read. It’s the ideal summer book. 

3) Racing Green – Kit Chapman

I’m just at the tail-end of finishing this book, and while there were times when my brain was challenged on the technical aspects of lithium batteries, its teachings were quite comprehensive. This is a book you need to read if you’ve ever had an interest in Formula E or just electric technology in the automotive space (check out our EVs Explained series, wink, wink).

Kit Chapman makes some otherwise nonsensical technical jargon far more palatable for us mere mortals not into physics or aerodynamics. There’s love and humor that comes from him as he retells the history of the cars and people in this space. Focusing on some notable moments in motorsports, Chapman weaves the old and new ways together.

This book also serves as a travel diary, further proving how global the minds and hands dedicated to motorsports are. The technological advances made within motorsports are far-reaching, and the findings can improve many aspects of our lives.

This book is, in fact quite hilarious, so don’t let the big-brained concepts scare you off. You’ll be able to drop some fun historical racing historical factoids to your friends after reading as well.

4) How To Build A Car – Adrian Newey

If you want to know the nitty-gritty process of building an F1 car, this is the book from the man who has designed for champions. Adrian Newey is a Red Bull engineer who knows his stuff. He’s the guy in the room everyone looks to when there’s a problem. Being one of the most prolific engineers in the sport commands a heightened level of respect and delivers a perspective others don’t have, and this book breaks down years of his designs and thinking. It’s quite technical at times, but even if you don’t understand every facet of its teachings, it still makes a gorgeous coffee table book with beautifully detailed diagrams and graphics. This book will make you look cooler and smarter to your non-racing pals.

5) Max Verstappen (2022 Edition) – James Gray

I am a Max fan. But if you aren’t, this book could make you one. It doesn’t shy away from Max’s messy parts or controversies. He was brash and arrogant when he entered the scene, for sure. The crashes, the attitude, the abuse. It’s all there. It humanizes him and his experiences, especially with his father. His mother, Sophie Kumpe, is honestly the source of his talent, and understanding the inner workings of his family explains more than you’d think. For instance, I actually didn’t know the lion on his helmet was designed by his sister!

The timeline of everyone entering each other’s lives and how young they all were is fascinating. Learning about the first interactions with Charles Leclerc, Carlos Sainz, and Daniel Riccardo is compelling. And yes, “Just an inchidet” is addressed.

That being said, this updated edition does include the controversial Abu Dhabi Grand Prix 2021. And reading the iconic Toto Wolff radio message, “No, Michael, no, no, Michael! That was so not right!” still absolutely hits, even in written form.

@kartworthy

#stitch with @Dr. Sable | Orthodontist So Lewis led most of the race and looked on course to win…. 🏎️😭 Ps. I am in my booth at FlameCon 😂 #formula1 #f1tiktok #f1edits #formulaone #formula1meme #motorsports #f1memes #lewishamilton #maxverstappen #abudhabi2021gp #mercedesf1 #redbullracing

♬ original sound – Sheilah 🏎️💎💖

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The 7 best places to buy tires: where to order tires and schedule installations online

This article contains affiliate links, which means Acceleramota may receive a commission on any sales from the best places to buy tires at no additional cost to you. Our content is written independently and is not influenced by these affiliate partnerships. We strive to provide accurate and unbiased information, and any opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the author.

Like everything else, how we shop for tires has changed a ton over the last decade. Gone are the days of headache-inducing trips from service chain to service chain. Never again do you have to drive all over town, on the off chance that one of them has your size. Today, as with most things, replacing those worn-down treads is as simple as placing an order on your phone from one of the best places to buy tires.

Most of these online retailers offer the option for delivery – some will even come to your house. Because no one wants to chug along to the shop on donuts, we’ll set you up with a set of tires you don’t even have to put on pants for. No matter how involved you want to be in the process, which brands you prefer (if any), and how much you want to spend, we’ll get you there safely, no spare needed.

Choosing the best place to buy tires online

To decide which tire retailers are the best, we looked at cost, spread, shipping, ease of installation, warranty, and consumer satisfaction.

Best place to buy tires overall: Tire Rack

Image credit: Tire Rack

Pros:

  • Unique full-service experience with fully tested reviews
  • Wide selection of top brands and free shipping on orders above $50

Cons:

  • 30-day return policy only applies to unused treads

When it comes to online tire retails, Tire Rack is heads and shoulders above everyone else. The retailer specializes in wheels, tires, and auto accessories. Headquartered in Indianapolis, Tire Rack works with vetted independent installers across the country who receive and fit the orders. It also tests and rates tires on a hockey rink, road course, and its special testing track. If there ever was a Ferrari of tire stores, Tire Rack would take home the title.

Because it tests the tires before it sells them, Tire Rack can leverage its own database to provide a unique full-service experience with which no one else has the resources to compete. As a result, you can purchase a set of tires from Tire Rack knowing nothing about tires going in. Its Tire Decision Guide narrows down your options by asking you a brief series of questions: What car do you drive? Did you go for the sport package or upgrade the brakes? What conditions will you drive in? In less than two minutes, you’ve got yourself a winner.

Tire Rack scores points with its easy-to-use website and incredible resource center for all things tires. 

In addition to its approachable design and unparalleled resource center, Tire Rack scores points for its wide selection of top brands and free shipping on orders above $50. It is worth noting, however, that Tire Rack’s 30-day return policy only applies to unused treads. That being said, on top of the manufacturer’s warranty, the retailer’s own two-year hazard warranty comes standard. I suppose that makes up for it.

Best lifetime warranty: Walmart

Image credit: Marques Thomas (Unsplash)

Pros:

  • Competitive pricing on a wide selection of tires
  • Many locations offer tire services like mounting and balancing

Cons:

  • Warranty pricing can be inconsistent

Although it can’t match the level of detail in its recommendations offered by specialty retailers like Tire Rack, the tire department at Walmart deserves a second look. Those with antiquated views of Walmart as the ‘Great Value’ option across the board may change their minds when they see everything from premium brands like Goodyear, Michelin, and Bridgestone, in addition to their budget-friendly alternatives. 

Walmart, of course, has the advantage of competitive pricing, but you can also opt for additional services like mounting and balancing – in some cases at no additional cost. That makes Walmart a full-service solution for tire purchases and installation, assuming there’s a store with an Auto Care Center nearby. Its online platform offers free shipping on select tires, and you can have them shipped to your local store for in-person pickup. 

The one caveat is Walmart’s inconsistent warranty pricing. While you do have the option of road hazard insurance, the price ranges from $10 to $14 per tire depending on your state. On top of that, there is a separate lifetime balance and rotation warranty that costs an additional $10 to $14 depending on your state. Still, that’s a pretty great deal for a lifetime of basic tire maintenance, so I’m not complaining.

Best finance options: SimpleTire

Image credit: SimpleTire

Pros:

  • Offers multiple financing options
  • Free shipping and 30-day window for tire returns

Cons:

  • 30-day return policy does not cover used tires

SimpleTire uses a network of independent tire shops nationwide, allowing for a variety of tires and installation spots. When you buy a tire on the website, you can pay ahead for installation. You can also finance your entire purchase, ideal for those unforeseen incidents you didn’t budget for ahead of time, e.g., a nail puncture or a leak… or both. With four different financing options to choose from, as long as you have decent enough credit, you can guarantee approval for at least one of the interest-free options.

You can chat with a tire expert from the retailer to help you select the correct size of tires for your car. Alternatively, you can use its in-house developed SimpleSnap, which lets you take a picture of your current tires and matches it with the exact tire on the site. After being processed within 30 minutes of the order being placed, 25% of customers can expect to receive their tires the next day. The other 75% may have to wait an extra day. Still, shipping is free, and there’s a 30-day window to return tires, provided you didn’t use them first.

Best membership perks: Costco

Image credit: Costco

Pros:

  • Offers a range of quality tires at competitive prices
  • Tire services included in the purchase price

Cons:

  • Must be a Costco member to access tire services and pricing

Costco is well-known for its wholesale approach, and while the average person isn’t going to be purchasing tires in bulk, you can still save a fair amount on your next set. Members can access a range of quality tires from top brands at competitive prices. The Costco Tire Center provides various services, such as tire installation, balancing, rotation, and flat repairs, all included in the tire purchase price. Additionally, there’s a generous 5-year road hazard warranty, which covers ordinary damages like potholes and nails.

One limitation of shopping at Costco is that you must be a member to take advantage of their tire services and pricing. However, StackSocial is currently offering 50% back when you sign up for a yearly membership, the benefits of which we explained at length in another post. Considering it costs $60 at full price, that’s seven chicken bakes you can eat while getting your tires put on. Maybe you shouldn’t, but you can. I’m not your dad.

Best return policy: TireBuyer

Image credit: TireBuyer

Pros:

  • Ships tires to a local installer within its extensive network
  • Generous 45-day return policy for used tires

Cons:

  • Return shipping isn’t always free

Like Tire Rack, you can purchase tires online at TireBuyer, after which they are shipped to a local installer. TireBuyer has an extensive network consisting of over 10,000 installers nationwide. Your tires can reach an installer 24 to 48 hours after placing an order, according to the retailer, making the whole process relatively painless. If that isn’t enough, TireBuyer sweetens the deal with free shipping.

If you inadvertently order the wrong tires, TireBuyer has its own truck fleet, allowing buyers to return tires for free. Alternatively, if you ordered the tires to your doorstep, you might have to cut your losses and eat the cost of sending them back through FedEx. TireBuyer’s 45-day return policy for used tires is generous, even if that comes with an asterisk, those four scary words: terms and conditions apply.

Best tire deals: Discount Tire

Image credit: Discount Tire

Pros:

  • Typically offers the lowest prices with many deals
  • Over 1,000 physical locations for in-person service

Cons:

  • Store locations are limited to specific regions

Discount Tire is another leading name in the digital age of tire commerce. As its name suggests, the site is flooded with so many deals at any given time you should never have to pay full price. Not only does it tend to be the cheapest place to buy tires, but it’s also one of the more flexible options. This retailer caters to the needs of its online and in-person customers (sort of like us!) with more than 1,000 locations across 35 states. Although most are located in the midwest and down south, those with a store nearby can choose between ordering online or doing things the old-fashioned way, if you’re so inclined.

The brick-and-mortar stores also serve as tire installation and balancing centers. Discount Tire has an extensive range of products in its inventory, from popular brands to the more obscure. It also offers an in-house system – Treadwell – allowing users to select the appropriate car tire. If it looks similar to Tire Rack’s Decision Guide, that may have something to do with the fact that Discount Tire acquired Tire Rack in 2021. Turns out it pays to be cheap! 

Other perks of buying from Discount Tires include free ground shipping in the 48 contiguous states, a solid road-hazard warranty, discounts, and promotions. If your purchase isn’t satisfactory, Discount Tires will make it right on the condition that the tires are correctly repackaged.

Best installation network: Amazon

Image credit: Amazon

Pros:

  • Vast selection from industry leaders to budget-friendly alternatives
  • Prime members enjoy free shipping and free returns on specific products

Cons:

  • Warranty coverage can be unclear

Amazon may not be first on your list when you’re shopping for tires, but its vast selection from industry leaders to budget-friendly alternatives makes it a strong contender in the online tire retail space. Partnering with independent installers across the country, Amazon offers a convenient tire installation experience, while Prime members enjoy free shipping on select tires and free returns on specific products.

The user-friendly website helps you find the right tires based on vehicle type, tire size, and brand. Although warranty coverage can be unclear, Amazon’s range of installer-provided warranties compensates for the lack of hazard protection. Overall, Amazon’s diverse selection, competitive pricing, and convenient online shopping experience make it a solid choice for your next tire purchase.

Best shipping time: Priority Tire

Image credit: Priority Tire

Pros:

  • Same-day shipping
  • Generous tire rebates from various manufacturers

Cons:

  • 90-day return policy does not cover used tires

You need some tires and you need them now. Priority Tire offers free ground shipping for anywhere within the continental United States (sorry Hawaii and Alaska) and if you place your order early enough, they will ship out on the same business day.

The search tool Priority Tire has built into the front page makes finding exactly what you need a breeze. Your average driver probably doesn’t know much about tires and would likely struggle to name even a single manufacturer off the top of their head. It’s easy to plug in the year, make, and model of your vehicle to get a curated selection of what will fit for you. But it doesn’t stop there. Priority Tire keeps tabs on any ongoing manufacturer rebates which you can click through to and it will retain your personal vehicle info. You see only the feasible options for you and it makes it easy to ensure you’re getting the best deal you can.

Across the board, most tire dealers return policy tend not to cover any tire that has touched pavement (exaggerated) and Priority Tire is no different – rejecting reimbursement on any tire that has been mounted, damaged, or used by the buyer. That said, there is a wide window of 90 days to make your return which is larger than a lot of other options on this list.

Things to consider when buying tires online

When shopping for tires online, it’s crucial to account for many different factors, such as brands, sizes, and pricing options, to make the best decision for your vehicle.

Overall cost

Consider the final cost of buying tires online, which includes shipping, installation, and the tire price itself. Be cautious of discounted tires, as they may be older and could have potential issues like cracking and drying out, leading to blowouts or loss of traction.

Tire size explained

It’s not uncommon for people to mistakenly purchase the wrong size tires for their cars, leading to the hassle of refunds and replacements. To avoid this, always verify the correct tire size before buying. You can find your tire size on the sidewall, in your vehicle’s owner’s manual, or on the label inside the driver’s side door frame.

Tire size explained image
Image Credit: Discount Tire
  • Section width: Tire width from sidewall to sidewall when mounted.
  • Aspect ratio: Percentage of the tire you can see from the side (so this tire’s height from rim to edge is 55% of the tire width).
  • Tire construction: Tire construction refers to how the tire is built. Most passenger car tires are radial (R).
  • Wheel diameter: The inch diameter of the rim the tire is mounted on, also called rim size.
  • Load index: The load index number refers to a specific weight and is the maximum load each tire can support..
  • Speed rating: Speed rating is the maximum speed a tire can support its maximum load at, from L to Y.

Weather and road conditions

The typical weather and road conditions in your area dictate the kind of tires you need. The tread pattern, tread life, load capacity, speed rating, and fuel efficiency all have an impact on how your tires perform in treacherous environments. Even your warranty matters.

For instance, tires designed for icy conditions won’t perform optimally on dry roads, and vice versa. If you frequently go off-roading or drive on rough terrain, you might want to think about all-terrain or mud-terrain tires for optimal performance.

Other factors to consider when buying tires online include tread pattern, tread life, load capacity, speed rating, fuel efficiency, and warranty.

In conclusion, buying tires online offers convenience and cost-effectiveness, but thorough research is necessary to ensure you get the best tires for your driving needs. With this knowledge, you can confidently compare perks and prices, ensuring the perfect tires arrive at your doorstep.

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Buying Guides

The best car subscription services for drivers with commitment issues

For better or for worse, there’s a subscription for everything in 2023. You can subscribe to TV, movies, video games, and even a place to store it all in the form of cloud storage. With the overall cost of car ownership on the rise, many consumers are turning to the fledgling car subscription market in its place.

As with most big investments, car ownership comes with its downsides. The price of a new car is more expensive than ever, and that’s before factoring in recurring costs like service and maintenance. In an act of desperation, you might be tempted to give in to the predatory interest rates at your local Nissan dealer. I mean, what other choice do you have than 30% APR?

Image credit: Big Altima Energy (Facebook)

A car subscription service provides an alternative to buying and leasing. In the same way you subscribe to Netflix or Spotify, you can now add a new Porsche or Audi to your queue. However, while subscribing to a car may sound like a foolproof plan, you’ll want to consider the downsides before asking where to sign. But don’t worry, we’ve got your back. We’ll not only help you figure out if a car subscription is right for you, but we’ve also weighed the pros and cons of the best car subscription services at your disposal in 2023.

Why choose a car subscription

  • No commitment: One month you want to tour the country in an Audi e-tron Sportback. For your next trick, you’re showing up in a new BMW M3. Pay the fee and swap rides as often as your contract allows.
  • No liability: So, you got your dream sports car. Unfortunately, the engine blows up within a year, and the company and insurance say it’s your fault. Now you’re stuck with an $80,000 paperweight. A car subscription will come with liability insurance to protect you against these situations. As long as they occur under normal vehicle operation.
  • No financing: You’re not tied down to a depreciating asset that will be too expensive to own post-warranty period. If you no longer want the vehicle or can’t afford the monthly fee, just cancel it. Opting out of an auto loan is a hassle and will affect your credit score.

Read the fine print

It should be obvious that car subscriptions aren’t a path to vehicle ownership. You can never modify the vehicle or conduct your own repairs. This will breach the agreement and you’ll be liable for any potential damages the company says you caused. Any other damage beyond normal wear and tear, it’ll be your time to foot the bill, Bill.

If the company wants to void your contract for any reason, it’s allowed to take the car back – with or without your approval.  Any fee increases and extra charges are yours to pay. This is all outlined in the contract terms, but companies know no one reads them.

Car subscription fees

As for what’s included in your subscription:

  • Maintenance and insurance: Most subscription fees cover the basics, like oil changes and tire protection, so you never even have to think about where to buy tires online, provided you operate the car like a normal person. However, what qualifies as ‘normal’ varies from company to company.
  • Roadside assistance: If the car breaks down, the company will send a lovely stranger to help get you back on the road.
  • Monthly mileage:  Subscriptions allow you to drive a set amount of miles per month. Most agreements are between 1,500-2,000 miles.
  • Liability insurance: Liability insurance covers you for a specific amount if you’re injured in an accident.

The best car subscription services

Finn

Pros

  • Insurance, maintenance and delivery included
  • No application fee

Cons

  • 6-12 month subscription period
  • 850 monthly miles

Germany-based Finn wants to revolutionize the car ownership experience. Its focus is on carbon neutrality while providing consumers with a quick-and-easy signup process. There’s more to come from this exciting startup and we can’t wait to see it blossom.

[Update!] FINN have partnered with German automaker Audi to offer the A5 Sportback and Q5. Practical and powerful, you can drive one of these for 1000$ with 850 free miles.

Sixt+

Image credit: Sixt+

Pros

  • Unused mileage carries over
  • Month-to-month contract


Cons

  • 1000 monthly miles ($0.47 per extra mile)
  • Accident cover, liability insurance and roadside assistance are not part of the subscription fee

Customize is not just a word for the good folk over at Sixt. Its car subscription, Sixt+, lets you personalize your subscription from the app. All the info is front-and-center on the website. Sixt+ creates tailored recommendations to suit your needs, as opposed to one-car-fits-all. It’s a refreshing, slightly less corporate approach to car subscriptions.

Kyte

Image credit: Kyte

Pros

  • Wide range of vehicles (EV options)
  • Starts at $518


Cons

  • Only available in 14 cities
  • 850 miles free ($0.35 per extra mile)

Simplicity. Kyte doesn’t want to be more than a subscription.  Its focus is not on aesthetics or gimmicks, but rather offering a subscription that works for you every time.

Hertz My Car

Pros

  • Access to the full Hertz fleet
  • Unlimited miles
  • Insurance and loss waiver included

Cons

  • $1,660/month (Ford Focus, Austin Texas)
  • Personal insurance is $225
  • Additional drivers and roadside assistance cost extra

Hertz has been there, done that. If you’ve ever rented a car, Hertz is a company you’re familiar with. This means lower pricing and more cars to choose from, but you lose the personality and customer attention you get from smaller brands. At the end of the day, you’re dealing with a boring, old corporation. However, the Hertz My Car subscription service is as polished as you might expect from the company synonymous with car rentals.

Subscribe with Enterprise

Pros

  • Insurance, maintenance and roadside assistance come standard
  • Swap up to four times a month
  • 3,000 miles per month

Cons

  • Only available in three states (Minnesota, Missouri, Nevada)

Considering its modest price, Subscribe with Enterprise has a lot of perks. And coming from a household name in the rental car market, it damn well should. Contrary to its reputation, Enterprise doesn’t compromise on car quality either, with a wide range of premium SUVs and trucks to choose from. The bad news is that while it is one of the more compelling car subscription services, Subscribe with Enterprise is only active in a few states.

Porsche Drive

Image credit: Porsche

Pros: 

  • Delivery and pick-up available within 20 miles of a Porsche dealership
  • Insurance and maintenance included in subscription fee

Cons:

  • $595 activation fee
  • $2,420/month for a single vehicle subscription (Porsche 718 Cayman, Dallas Texas)

Drive your dream car, today. For many, owning a Porsche is a fantasy that will never die. Porsche Drive allows you to make it a reality for a month or two without breaking the bank.

Audi on demand

Image credit: Audi

Pros: 

  • $1574/month (Audi A5 Sportback in Austin, Texas)

Cons:

  • Full liability insurance is $924.
  • 1,000 miles limit ($0.30 per extra mile)

Audi on demand’s long-term drive service is impressive. You get the Audi experience without the hassle of owning a rapidly depreciating German luxury car. The pricing, range, and intuitive sign-up process make it one of the top car subscription contenders.

Autonomy EV subscriptions

Image Credit: Autonomy

Pros: 

  • Lowest monthly payment is $749/mo ($0 down payment)
  • Zero return fees (even on early returns)

Cons:

  • Limited vehicle selection
  • Hidden eligibility requirements
  • 1,000 miles limit ($0.25 per extra mile)

Go green or go home! Autonomy makes it easy for you to think about the future the next time you drive. No return fees mean no hassle when you crave that spontaneous Bali getaway. Eligibility is not tied to your credit score either, so it’s perfect if you’re a younger driver.

Car subscription vs leasing

Leasing is the primary option for most Americans when looking at a new vehicle. There are many reasons you should choose a lease over a car subscription, even if it’s not as shiny and new.

Leasing can be cheaper

Let’s say you’re in the market for a luxury vehicle, you might be more accepting of the fact that it will lose around 80% of its value in 5 years. But, for most Americans, a normal car or truck will do. The average car lease is around $528 as of 2022. Most car subscriptions cost $1000 or more. If you’re like most Americans, you’ll be paying double on a subscription vs a lease.

One thing that this doesn’t consider is maintenance cost liability. Encountering a serious issue with your vehicle often means the costs fall on solely on your shoulders. Add tires and fuel to that, the costs can be much more than $528.

Nobody enjoys dealing with major services, insurance hijinks and extra costs. The more you think about it, the less appealing leasing becomes. The subscription service market is very much in its infancy. Prices are bound to come down as the market grows. That Cadillac for $99.99 might be a reality in a few years.

The benefits of owning your vehicle

Vehicles are long-term purchase. With regular maintenance and conservative driving, most vehicles will last 10-15 years. Certain brands retain their value more than others (resale value). You can recoup a lot of money from your initial car purchase.

Spirited driving is not possible with some subscription services. Gunning your subscription car down a sideroad might only be a dream. Chances are the vehicle’s tracker will pick up on it and it will void your subscription. Crashing at higher speeds also means that the insurance will not pay out and you will be left with a serious bill to the subscription service company.

You can modify your vehicle. If you’re a garage monkey like me, you like to see if you can eek out a few more horsepower with engine mods. You don’t own the car, you can’t modify it.

59.4% of trips are shorter than 6 miles

People don’t drive that much. Only 4.9% of trips were more than 30 miles. Unfortunately, that still exceeds the default allocation of most subscription services. If you drive six miles, five days a week, your yearly mileage is 1260 miles. Feel free to calculate your own yearly mileage and choose the best subscription plan for your needs.

According to the Federal Highway Administration, Americans drive 14,263 miles per year on average. A car subscription is still a non-option for most Americans. Especially those that plan to use the service for their primary vehicle.

There is a a place for the car subscription. If you want a weekend joyride, a fun second vehicle or a bit of short-term luxury subscriptions trump leasing every time.

Embrace the future

The steady decline in new car ownership means manufacturers need to find new ways to sell cars. Subscriptions are here to stay. Still, a thriving used car scene, right-to-repair laws, and cheaper future electric vehicles mean that personal ownership will still be the norm for years to come. More choices are a good thing for you, the consumer. Why not welcome it, as an option, with open arms?

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